Category Archives: Tookaidoo Shinkansen

Shizuoka Prefecture Railway Stations: Tookaidoo Shinkansen (Atami City~Hamamatsu City)

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The Tookaidoo Shinkansen (東海道新幹線) is a Japanese high-speed Shinkansen line, opened in 1964 between Tokyo and Shin-Ōsaka. Since 1987 it has been operated by the Central Japan Railway Company (JR Central), prior to that by Japanese National Railways (JNR). It is the most heavily travelled high-speed rail route in the world by far; its cumulative ridership of 5.3 billion passengers dwarfs all other systems and lines worldwide.

The line was named a joint Historic Mechanical Engineering Landmark and IEEE Milestone by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers in 2000.

There are three types of trains on the line: from fastest to slowest, they are the Nozomi, Hikari, and Kodama. Many Nozomi and Hikari trains continue onward to the Sanyō Shinkansen, going as far as Fukuoka’s Hakata Station.

700 series and N700 series train sets operate on the line in any of the three service patterns. The Hikari run from Tokyo to Osaka took four hours in 1964; this was shortened to 3 hours 10 minutes in 1965. With the introduction of high-speed Nozomi service in 1992, the travel time was shortened to 2 hours 30 minutes. The introduction of N700 series trains in 2007 further reduced the Nozomi travel time to 2 hours 25 minutes. As of 14 March 2015, after a speed increase to 285 km/h (177 mph), the fastest Nozomi service now takes 2 hours 22 minutes from Tokyo to Shin-Osaka.

As of August 2008, Hikari services travel from Tokyo to Shin-Osaka in approximately 3 hours, with all-stopping Kodama services making the same run in about 4 hours.

Nozomi trains cannot be used by tourists using the Japan Rail Pass.

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The back cover of the first English-language timetable with the Tokaido Line Shinkansen service which launched on 1 October 1964.

The Tookaidoo Shinkansen line was originally conceived in 1940 as a 150 km/h (93 mph) dedicated railway between Tokyo and Shimonoseki, which would have been 50% faster than the fastest express train of the time. The beginning of World War II stalled the project in its early planning stages, although a few tunnels were dug that were later used in the Shinkansen route.

Construction of the line began on 20 April 1959 under JNR president Shinji Sogō and chief engineer Hideo Shima. It was completed in 1964, with the first train travelling from Tokyo to Shin-Osaka on 1 October 1964 at 210 km/h (130 mph). The opening was timed to coincide with the 1964 Summer Olympics in Tokyo, which had already brought international attention to the country. Originally, the line was called the New Tookaidoo Line in English. It is named after the Tookaidoo route of Japan, used for centuries. Speeds have been increased to 285 km/h (177 mph), except for lower limits applying between Tokyo and Shin-Yokohama and in densely populated urban areas around Nagoya, Kyoto and Shin-Osaka stations.

A new Shinkansen stop at Shinagawa Station opened in October 2003, accompanied by a major timetable change which increased the number of daily Nozomi services.

All Tookaidoo Shinkansen trains to and from Tokyo make station stops at Shinagawa and Shin-Yokohama. (Before March 2008, alternating Nozomi and Hikari services stopped at either or both of these stations.)

A new station, Minami-Biwako, was planned to open in 2012 between Maibara and Kyoto to allow a transfer to the Kusatsu Line. Construction started in May 2006, but in September 2006, the Ōtsu district court ruled that the ¥4.35 billion bond that Rittō city had issued to fund construction was illegal under the local finance law and had to be cancelled. The project was officially cancelled in October 2007.

An ultra-fast (500 km/h (311 mph) plus) maglev system, the Chūō Shinkansen, has been committed to construction, with a target date of 2020 for the line to start partial operation, and 2027 to connect Tokyo with Nagoya.[12]

It was announced in June 2010 that a new shinkansen station in Samukawa, Kanagawa Prefecture was under consideration by JR Central. If constructed, the station would open after the new maglev service begins operations.

In December 2013, JR Central president Yoshiomi Yamada announced the operating company’s intentions to raise the maximum line speed beyond 270 km/h, with a revised timetable to be introduced in spring 2015.[14] In February 2014, JR Central announced that, from spring 2015, the maximum speed would be increased to 285 km/h (175 mph) for services using N700A or modified N700 series trains.[15] Initially, just one service per hour will run at 285 km/h, with more services gradually added later.

ATAMI STATION/熱海駅

SHINKANSEN-ATAMI

JR Atami Station
Location: Tahara Honchō, Atami City, Shizuoka Prefecture(静岡県熱海市田原本町)
GOOGLE MAP

Atami Station opened on March 25, 1925. On December 1, 1934 the Tanna Tunnel was completed, and through service to Mishima and Numazu began. The Itō Line began operations at Atami from March 30, 1935. The Tookaidoo Shinkansen began operations at Atami from October 1, 1964.
Atami Station is served by the Tookaidoo Main Line, Tookaidō Shinkansen, and Itō Line. The station is 104.6 km from Tokyo Station.
Due to its location on the side of a steep hill, Atami Station is built on several levels. On the lowest level is the station building itself, with automated ticket machines, Suica automated turnstiles and a manned “Green Window” service counter. The Tookaidoo Main Line and Itō Line share one side platform and two island platforms with five tracks connected by an underpass to the station building. The Tookaidoo Shinkansen with two opposing side platforms is one level higher, and is connected to the non-express platforms by an underpass.

Platforms
1 ■ Itō Line Itō, (Izukyū Corporation) Izukyū-Shimoda
2・3 ■ Tōkaidō Line for Mishima, Numazu, Shizuoka, and Hamamatsu
■ Itō Line for Itō and Izukyū-Shimoda
4・5 ■ Tōkaidō Line for Odawara, Hiratsuka, Yokohama, and Tokyo
6 ■ Tōkaidō Shinkansen for Nagoya, Shin-Osaka, and Hakata
7 ■ Tōkaidō Shinkansen for Odawara, Shin-Yokohama, Shinagawa, and Tokyo

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MISHIMA STATION/三島駅

TOKAIDO-LINE-MISHIMA

JR Mishima Station South entrance
Location: 16-1 Ichiban-chō, Mishima City, Shizuoka Prefecture(静岡県三島市一番町16-1)
GOOGLE MAP

The original Mishima Station was opened on June 15, 1896 in the town of Nagaizumi. However, with the completion of the Tanna Tunnel between Atami and Numazu, this station was renamed Shimo-Togari Station, and a new Mishima Station was opened at its present location on December 1, 1934. The terminus of the Izuhakone Railway was also relocated to Mishima Station at this time. On April 25, 1969, Tokaidoo Shinkansen services began serving Mishima Station. Regularly scheduled freight service was discontinued in 1974, however, private freight services to the Toray Industries Mishima plant continued on a spur line until 2007. In 2008, Mishima Station was extensively remodeled, and an ASTY shopping complex was opened at the station.

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Mishima Station shortly after completion in 1934

JR Mishima Station has two island platforms serving tracks 1 to 4. Track 2 and Track 3 are the primary tracks for the Tokaido Main Line, with Tracks 1 and 4 used for through passage of express trains. The Tokaido Shinkansen uses Tracks 5 and 6, which are served by a separate island platform. The adjacent Izuhakone Railway has one side platform and two bay platforms serving Tracks 7, 8 and 9. All platforms are connected by an underpass to a central concourse leading to the station building. The station building has automated ticket machines, TOICA automated turnstiles and a staffed Midori no Madoguchi ticket office.

Platforms
1 ■ Izuhakone Railway Sunzu Line for Daiba, Izu-Nagaoka, and Shuzenji
■ Tokaido Main Line for Atami, Odawara, Yokohama, and Tokyo
2 ■ Tokaido Main Line for Numazu, Fuji, and Shizuoka
3 ■ Tokaido Main Line for Atami, Odawara, Yokohama, and Tokyo
4 ■ Tokaido Main Line for Numazu, Fuji, and Shizuoka
5 ■ Tokaido Shinkansen for Nagoya and Shin-Osaka
6 ■ Tokaido Shinkansen for Shin-Yokohama and Tokyo

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SHIN FUJI STATION/新富士駅 (not to be confused with Fuji Station/富士駅) which does not serve the Shinkansen Trains)

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Shin Fuji Station North side
Location: 640 Narishima, Fuji City, Shizuoka Prefecture(静岡県富士市川成島640)GOOGLE MAP

Shin-Fuji Station opened on March 13, 1988. The station is located in an industrial area, initially with few residences, stores, or connecting lines, and was a stop only for the Kodama service on the Tokaido Shinkansen.
Shin-Fuji Station is served by the Tokaido Shinkansen, and is located 146.2 km (90.8 mi) from the eastern terminus of the line at Tokyo Station. There are no connecting rail lines to Shin-Fuji, with the nearest connecting being located at Fuji Station 2 km (1.2 mi) away. A connecting bus service runs several times an hour taking approximately 7 minutes.
Shin-Fuji Station is an elevated station with two opposed side platforms, connected to one another and to the station building by an underpass. The station building has automated ticket machines, automated turnstiles, and a “Midori no Madoguchi” staffed ticket office

Platforms
1 ■ Tokaido Shinkansen for Shin-Yokohama and Tokyo
2 ■ Tokaido Shinkansen for Nagoya and Shin-Ōsaka

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SHIZUOKA STATION/静岡駅

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Shizuoka Station North side
Location: Kurogane-chō, Aoi Ku, Shizuoka City, Shizuoka Prefecture(静岡県静岡市葵区黒金町
GOOGLE MAP

Shizuoka station first opened on February 1, 1889, when the section of the Tookaidoo Main Line connecting Shizuoka with Kōzu was completed. A grand opening ceremony had been planned, but on this day a huge fire destroyed over 1,000 buildings in downtown Shizuoka. Railroad Minister Inoue Masaru cancelled his planned visit, and later the same day, the town around Gotemba Station, also in Shizuoka Prefecture, burned down. The initial Shizuoka Station building was rebuilt in 1907 and again in 1935. The Tookaidoo Shinkansen platforms were opened in 1964. In 1967, freight operations were relocated from Shizuoka Station to Higashi-Shizuoka Station (the present-day Shizuoka Freight Terminal). The station underwent a massive rebuilding program from the late 1970s, with the Tōkaidō Main Line tracks elevated in 1979 to the same level as the Tōkaidō Shinkansen tracks, and the Parche shopping center/new station building completed in 1981. From 2006 to 2008, major renovations took place inside and around the station, including the underground walkways to and from the station, and the Asty shopping and dining complexes adjoined to the station.
Shizuoka Station has four platforms serving six tracks. Two island platforms with Tracks 1–4 serve the Tookaidoo Main Line trains, and long distance night trains. These platforms are connected with the station concourse via an underpass and are also connected at the same level to the Tookaidoo Shinkansen platforms. The Shinkansen station consists of two opposing side platforms serving two tracks, with two central tracks for non-stop trains. The station building has automated ticket machines, TOICA automated turnstiles, and a manned “Green Window” service counter.

Platforms
1 ■ Tōkaidō Main Line for Numazu and Atami
■ Sleeping Car trains for Ōsaka, Shikoku, and Chugoku
2 ■ Tōkaidō Main Line for Numazu and Atami
■ Limited Express Fujikawa for Minobu and Kōfu
■ Sleeping Car trains for Ōsaka, Shikoku, Chugoku
3,4 ■ Tōkaidō Main Line for Hamamatsu and Toyohashi
5 ■ Tōkaidō Shinkansen for Mishima and Tokyo
6 ■ Tōkaidō Shinkansen for Shin-Ōsaka and Hakata

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KAKEGAWA STATION/掛川駅

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JR Kakegawa Station South exit
Location: 1-1 Minami 1-chome, Kakegawa City, Shizuoka Prefecture(静岡県掛川市南1-1-1)
GOOGLE MAP

Kakegawa Station was first opened on April 16, 1889 when the section of the Tōkaidō Main Line connecting Shizuoka with Hamamatsu was completed. In 1935 the first section of the Tenryū Hamanako Line opened, with Kakegawa Station as its terminus. Regular freight service was discontinued in 1984. On March 13, 1988 the Tōkaidō Shinkansen platforms opened on the south side of the station.

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North exit to JR Kakegawa Station

JR Kakegawa Station has five platforms serving eight tracks. The Tookaidoo Main Line Track 1 is served by a side platform connected to the main station building’s north exit and the Tenryū Hamanako Line station. It is used for departing both east and west. Track 2 and Track 3 are served by an island platform. Both platforms are connected to the station building by an underpass, which also connects to the two elevated side platforms used by the Shinkansen (Track 4 and Track 5). The north side of the station is a wooden structure dating from 1940. The station building has automated ticket machines, TOICA automated turnstiles and a manned “Green Window” service counter.

Platforms
1 ■ Tōkaidō Main Line Shimada・Shizuoka・Hamamatsu・Toyohashi
2 ■ Tōkaidō Main Line Shimada・Shizuoka
3 ■ Tōkaidō Main Line Hamamatsu・Toyohashi
4 ■ Tōkaidō Shinkansen Shizuoka ・ Tokyo
5 ■ Tōkaidō Shinkansen Nagoya ・ Shin-Osaka

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SHINAKANSEN-KAKEGAWA-TENHAMA

Tenryū Hamanako Kakegawa Station

Transfer is available from the JR line to the Tenryū Hamanako Line, whose terminus bay platform is in a separate building adjacent to the north exit of the JR station.

HAMAMATTSU STATION/浜松駅

TOKAIDO-LINE-HAMAMATSU

Hamamatsu Station south exit
Location: 6-2 Sunayama-chō, Naka Ku, Hamamatsu City, Shizuoka Prefecture(静岡県浜松市中区砂山町6-2)
GOOGLE MAP

Hamamatsu Station was officially opened on September 1, 1888. The station building was rebuilt in 1926, but this burned down during the Bombing of Hamamatsu in World War II. The station was rebuilt in 1948. On October 1, 1964, the Tōkaidō Shinkansen began operations, serving Hamamatsu. Freight operations were relocated to the Nishi-Hamamatsu Freight Depot to the west in 1971. The station underwent a massive rebuilding program from the late 1970s, with the Tōkaidō Main Line tracks elevated in 1979 to the same level as the Tōkaidō Shinkansen tracks, and the “MayOne” shopping centre/new station building completed in 1981.
Hamamatsu Station has two island platforms serving Tracks 1-4 for the Tōkaidō Shinkansen, which are connected by an underpass a central concourse. At the same level as the Shinkansen tracks are the two island platforms serving Tracks 5-8 of the Tōkaidō Main Line. The station building has automated ticket machines, TOICA automated turnstiles and a manned “Midori no Madoguchi” ticket counter.

Platforms
1 ■ Home Liner for Kakegawa and Shizuoka
2 ■ Tōkaidō Main Line for Toyohashi and Nagoya
3 ■ Tōkaidō Main Line for Kakegawa and Shizuoka
4 ■ Tōkaidō Main Line for Toyohashi and Nagoya
5 ■ Tōkaidō Shinkansen for Shin-Yokohama and Tokyo
6 ■ Tōkaidō Shinkansen for Nagoya, Shin-Osaka, and Hakata

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