Category Archives: Tookaidoo Main Line

Shizuoka Prefecture Railway Stations: Tookaidoo Main Line (Atami City~Shinjohara)

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Opening day of the Tookaidoo Line in Shinbashi, Tokyo, on October 14th, 1872

The Tookaidoo Main Line (東海道本線 Tookaidoo-honsen) is a major Japanese railway line of the Japan Railways Group (JR Group) network, connecting Tokyo and Kōbe stations. It is 589.5 km (366.3 mi) long, not counting its many freight feeder lines around the major cities. The high-speed Tokaido Shinkansen largely parallels the line.

The term “Tōkaidō Main Line” is largely a holdover from pre-Shinkansen days; now various portions of the line have different names which are officially used by JR East, JR Central, and JR West. Today, there are no passenger trains that operate over the entire length of the line (other than certain overnight services; see below), so longer intercity trips require several transfers along the way.

The Tokaido Main Line is owned and operated by three JR companies:

East Japan Railway Company (JR East) (Tokyo – Atami)
Central Japan Railway Company (JR Central) (Atami – Maibara)
West Japan Railway Company (JR West) (Maibara – Koobe)

The Tokaido Line between Atami and Maibara is operated by JR Central, and covers the Tōkai region – Shizuoka Prefecture, Aichi Prefecture, and Gifu Prefecture.

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Mishima Tamachi Station in 1914

The Tookaidoo route takes its name from the ancient road connecting the Kansai region (Kyoto, Osaka) with the Kantō region (Tokyo, then Edo) through the Tookai region (including Nagoya). Literally, it was the Tookai road, or Road through Tōkai. The Tookaidoo Line does not follow the old road exactly, since the latter diverges at Nagoya toward the Mie Prefecture coastline; to follow it by train, the Kansai Main Line and Kusatsu Line would have to be followed from Nagoya to Kusatsu. The largest population centers in Japan are along this route – Tokyo, Yokohama, Nagoya, Kyoto, Osaka and Kobe. These centers have grown to occupy an ever more dominant role in the country’s government, financial, manufacturing and cultural life.

Historically, one of the first priorities of Japanese railway planners was to build a line from Tokyo to the Kansai region, either following the Tokaido route or the northern Nakasendō route. This decision remained unresolved as regional needs were addressed. The first railway in Japan was the line from Shinbashi to Sakuragicho in Yokohama, which opened in 1872; another segment of today’s Tokaido Main Line, between Kyoto and Kobe, opened in 1877.

In 1883, the government decided to use the Nakasendo route, and construction of several segments commenced (including the modern-day Takasaki Line). Railways were opened between Ogaki and Nagahama (1884) and between Nagoya and Kisogawa (1886) in line with the Nakasendo plan. However, by 1886, it was clear that the Tokaido route would be more practical, and so the Nakasendo plan was abandoned.

The lines between Kisogawa and Ogaki, Yokohama and Kozu, and Hamamatsu and Obu were completed in 1887, and the first line from Tokyo to Kobe was completed in 1889, when Kozu and Hamamatsu were connected through the present-day Gotemba Line corridor, and the final segments were completed between Kasumigahara and Otsu. At the time, there was one Tokyo-Kobe train in each direction per day, taking over 20 hours each way.

The “Tokaido Line” name was formally adopted in 1895. In October 1895, following the Sino-Japanese War, through service to the Sanyo Railway (now Sanyo Main Line) began. Express service between Tokyo and Kobe began in 1896, sleeper service in 1900, and dining car service in 1901.

In 1906, all privately run main lines were nationalized under the newly created Japan Imperial Railway, which, at the time had a network of just over 7000 km. Automatic couplers were introduced on all freight wagons in 1926. In 1930, the first Tsubame (“swallow”) express was introduced, reducing the Tokyo – Kobe travel-time to nine hours – a significant reduction from the twenty hours required in 1889 and fifteen in 1903.

Infrastructure improvements included the completion of double track on this route in 1913, and the opening of the 7.8 km long Tanna Tunnel, which shortened the route by omitting a detour round the mountains between Atami and Numazu. This was the last major change to the alignment of the route.

By the early 1950s the Tookaidoo Line had become the main transportation artery of Japan. Although it was only 3 percent of the railway system by length, it carried 24 percent of JNR’s passenger traffic and 23 percent of its freight, and the rate of growth was higher than any other line in the country. By 1956 electrification was completed along the Tokyo-Osaka section and with the introduction of new Kodama trains, travel time was reduced to six and a half hours. The line became so popular that tickets regularly sold out within ten minutes of being put on sale, one month in advance of the travel date.

The capacity constraints on the Tookaidoo Main Line had been clear prior to World War II, and work started on a new 1,435 mm (4 ft 8 1⁄2 in) standard gauge “bullet train” line in 1940. Intercity passenger traffic between Tokyo, Nagoya and Osaka largely transferred to the Tookaido Shinkansen after it was completed in 1964. Since then, the Tokaido Main Line has been used as a commuter and freight line, serving a very small number of long-distance passenger trains (mainly overnight and sleeper services).

Former connecting lines

Atami Station: In 1895, a 10 km 610 mm (2 ft) gauge handcar line opened to Yoshihama, and was extended 4 km to Odawara the following year. In 1907, the line was converted to 762 mm (2 ft 6 in) gauge and steam locomotives were introduced. The line closed in 1923 as a result of the Great Kanto earthquake.

Numazu Station: The Shuname Railway opened a 7 km line to Mishima-Tamachi on the Izuhakone Railway Sunzu Line in 1906. In 1915, the line was truncated 1 km to connect at Mishima-Hirokoji, and the line was electrified at 600 V DC in 1919. The line closed in 1961 following the destruction of the Kisegawa bridge during a flood.

Yoshiwara Station: The Fuji Horse Tramway (富士馬車鉄道 Fuji Basha Tetsudō?) opened a 610 mm (2 ft) gauge line to Ōmiya (presentday Fujinomiya) in 1890. The Fuji Minobu Railway (富士身延鉄道 Fuji Minobu Tetsudō?) purchased the tramway in 1912, converted it to a 1,067 mm gauge steam railway the following year and gradually extended it (eventually becoming the Minobu Line). In 1924, the company built a new alignment which connected to Fuji station on the Tokaido main line, at which time the original section from Omiya to Yoshiwara closed.

Shimizu Station: The JGR opened a 2 km freight-only line to Shimizu wharf in 1916. In 1944, the line was extended 6 km to Miha and passenger services were introduced. The line closed in 1984.

Shizuoka Station: The Abe Railway opened a 9 km 762 mm (2 ft 6 in) gauge line from Inomiya (approximately 2 km from Shizuoka) to Ushizuma in 1914 to haul timber. Plans to extend the line to Shizuoka did not eventuate and the line closed in 1934.

he Shizuoka Electric Railway opened a 2 km line to Anzai, connecting to its Shimizu Line, electrified at 600 V DC, between 1922 and 1926. The line closed in 1962.

Yaizu Station: A 5 km 610 mm (2 ft) handcar line operated to Fujieda between 1891 and 1900.

Fujieda Station: The Fuji-sho Railway opened a 4 km 762 mm (2 ft 6 in) gauge line to Ote in 1913, and by 1926 had extended the line progressively in both directions for a length of 38 km from Jitogata to Suruga-Okabe, although in 1936 the 5 km section from Suruga-Okabe to Ote was closed. In 1943, the company merged with the Shizuoka Railway (see Fujiroi Station below), and in 1948, a 7 km line between Mitsumata and Jitogata opened, linking the two sections. This section of the combined line closed between 1964 and 1970.

Shimada Station: The Fuji Prefectural Government opened a 3 km 610 mm (2 ft) gauge handcar line in 1898 to haul timber. In 1944, following the destruction of the nearby Tokaido Line bridge over the Oigawa, it was proposed to use the alignment of this line as a replacement, including a 930 m wooden bridge over the river. The bridge was about 25% completed when the end of the war resulted in the termination of the proposal. A diesel locomotive was introduced in 1955 to haul construction material for the construction of the adjacent national highway, and the line closed in 1959.

Kikukawa Station: The Joto horse-drawn tramway opened a 15 km 2 ft (610 mm) gauge line to Ikeshinden in 1899. In 1923, the line was converted to 762 mm (2 ft 6 in) gauge, and a single-cylinder diesel locomotive introduced. The line closed in 1935.

Fukuroi Station: The Akiba horse-drawn tramway opened a 12 km 762 mm (2 ft 6 in) gauge line to Enshumori-Cho in 1902. In 1926, the company renamed itself the Shizuoka Electric Railway, converted the line to 1,067 mm (3 ft 6 in) gauge and electrified it at 600 V DC. The line closed in 1962.

The Shizuoka Railway opened a 10 km 762 mm (2 ft 6 in) gauge line to Yokosuka in 1914, extending it 7 km to Mitsumata in 1927. The company merged with the Fuji-sho Railway in 1943 (see Fujieda Station above), and in 1948, a 7 km line between Mitsumata and Jitogata opened, linking the two sections. This section of the combined line closed between 1964 and 1967.

Hamamatsu Station: The Dainippon Railway opened a 7 km, 762 mm (2 ft 6 in) gauge line to Kuniyoshi in 1909. In 1919, the line was acquired by the Enshu Railway Line, which closed the first 1 km of the line in 1925, so the new connecting station became Enshu-Magome. The line closed in 1937.

ATAMI STATION/熱海駅

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Location: Tahara Honchō, Atami City, Shizuoka Prefecture(静岡県熱海市田原本町)
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Atami Station opened on March 25, 1925. On December 1, 1934 the Tanna Tunnel was completed, and through service to Mishima and Numazu began. The Itō Line began operations at Atami from March 30, 1935. The Tōkaidō Shinkansen began operations at Atami from October 1, 1964.
Atami Station is served by the Tōkaidō Main Line, Tōkaidō Shinkansen, and Itō Line. The station is 104.6 km from Tokyo Station.
Due to its location on the side of a steep hill, Atami Station is built on several levels. On the lowest level is the station building itself, with automated ticket machines, Suica automated turnstiles and a manned “Green Window” service counter. The Tōkaidō Main Line and Itō Line share one side platform and two island platforms with five tracks connected by an underpass to the station building. The Tōkaidō Shinkansen with two opposing side platforms is one level higher, and is connected to the non-express platforms by an underpass.

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KANNAMI STATION/函南駅

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Location: Ōtake, Kannami, Mishima City, Shizuoka Prefecture(静岡県三島市函南町大竹)
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Kannami Station was opened on December 1, 1934 when the section of the Tōkaidō Main Line connecting Atami with Numazu via the Tanna Tunnel was completed. Regularly scheduled freight service was discontinued in 1971. TOICA automated gates were installed in 2008.
It has a single Island platform serving Track 1 and Track 2, which are on passing loops with outside tracks to permit the through transit of express trains. The platform is connected to the station building by an overpass. The station building has automated ticket machines, TOICA automated turnstiles and a manned “Green Window” service counter.

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MISHIMA STATION/三島駅

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Location: 16-1 Ichiban-chō, Mishima City, Shizuoka Prefecture(静岡県三島市一番町16-1)
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Mishima Station in 1934

The original Mishima Station was opened on June 15, 1896 in the town of Nagaizumi. However, with the completion of the Tanna Tunnel between Atami and Numazu, this station was renamed Shimo-Togari Station, and a new Mishima Station was opened at its present location on December 1, 1934. The terminus of the Izuhakone Railway was also relocated to Mishima Station at this time. On April 25, 1969, Tokaido Shinkansen services began serving Mishima Station. Regularly scheduled freight service was discontinued in 1974, however, private freight services to the Toray Industries Mishima plant continued on a spur line until 2007. In 2008, Mishima Station was extensively remodeled, and an ASTY shopping complex was opened at the station.

Mishima Station is served by the following lines.

Tookaidoo Shinkansen
Tookaidoo Main Line
Izuhakone Railway Sunzu Line

JR Mishima Station has two island platforms serving tracks 1 to 4. Track 2 and Track 3 are the primary tracks for the Tokaido Main Line, with Tracks 1 and 4 used for through passage of express trains. The Tookaidoo Shinkansen uses Tracks 5 and 6, which are served by a separate island platform. The adjacent Izuhakone Railway has one side platform and two bay platforms serving Tracks 7, 8 and 9. All platforms are connected by an underpass to a central concourse leading to the station building. The station building has automated ticket machines, TOICA automated turnstiles and a staffed Midori no Madoguchi ticket office.

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NUMAZU STATION/沼津駅

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Location’ 1 Ōtemachi, Numazu City, Shizuoka Prefecture(静岡県沼津市大手町1丁目)GOOGLE MAP

Numazu Station opened on February 1, 1889 when the section of the Tōkaidō Main Line connecting Shizuoka with Kōzu was completed. A spur line to nearby Numazu Port was established in 1899. The first station building burned down in a fire of 1913 and the second in a fire of 1926. On December 1, 1934, Numazu was connected directly with Atami Station via the Tanna Tunnel, thus eliminating the previous long detour north to Gotemba Station in the section between Tokyo and Shizuoka. Numazu Station was rebuilt in 1937, but was burned down again, this time in the Bombing of Numazu in World War II. The next station building was erected in 1953, and rebuilt in 1973.

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Numazu station platforms

Numazu Station is served by the Tōkaidō Main Line from Tokyo and also the Gotemba Line. It lies 126.2 km from Tokyo Station.
Numazu Station has three ground-level island platforms serving six tracks, connected to each other and to the station building by both an overpass and an underpass. The station building has automated ticket machines, TOICA automated turnstiles and a “Midori no Madoguchi” staffed ticket office.

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KATAHAMA STATION/片浜駅

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Location: 254-1 Imazawa, Numazu City, Shizuoka Prefecture (静岡県沼津市今沢254-1)
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Katahama Station was opened on March 21, 1987,[1] the last train station to be built by the Japanese National Railways (JNR) before its privatization. With the privatization of JNR on 1 April 1987, the station came under the control of JR East.
The station has two opposing side platforms serving two tracks, with the station building built on the overpass connecting the platforms. The station building has automated ticket machines, TOICA automated turnstiles, and a “Midori no Madoguchi” staffed ticket office.

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HARA STATION/原駅

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Location: Hara 383-2, Numazu City, Shizuoka Prefecture(静岡県沼津市原383-2)GOOGLE MAP

ara Station was opened on February 25, 1900 as part of the expansion of the Tōkaidō Main Line from Numazu Station to Yoshiwara Station. The original station building was rebuilt in 1948. Regularly scheduled freight services were discontinued from 1984, and charter freight from 1997; however, freight services continue along a privately held spur line to a freight terminal owned by Taiheiyo Cement a short distance from Hara Station.

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Hara Station has a single side platform serving Track 1 and an island platform serving Track 2 and Track 3, connected to the station building by an overpass. Track 1 is not in regular use. The station building has automated ticket machines, TOICA automated turnstiles and a manned “Green Window” service counter.

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HIGASHI TAGO NO URA STATION/東田子の浦駅

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Location: Naka-Kashiwabara Shinden 171, Fuji City, Shizuoka Prefecture(静岡県富士市中柏原新田171)
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Higashi-Tagonoura Station was opened on September 15, 1949 primarily as a commuter station serving workers for nearby heavy industry.
Higashi-Tagonoura Station has a single side platform serving Track 1 and an island platform serving Track 2 and Track 3, connected to the station building by an overpass. Track 2 is used for through transit of express trains, as is Track 4 (without platform) to the outside of Track 3. The station building has automated ticket machines, TOICA automated turnstiles and a manned “Green Window” service counter.

YOSHIWARA STATION/吉原駅

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Location: Suzukawa-Honchō 14, Fuji City, Shizuoka Prefecture(静岡県富士市鈴川本町14)
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Yoshiwara Station (吉原駅 Yoshiwara-eki) is an interchange railway station in Fuji, Shizuoka Prefecture, Japan. The station is 141.3 rail kilometers from Tokyo Station. Yoshiwara is on the Tōkaidō Main Line of Central Japan Railway Company and is a terminal station for the Gakunan Railway Line of the Gakunan Electric Train and a freight terminal of the Japan Freight Railway Company.
Yoshiwara Station first opened as Suzukawa Station (鈴川駅 Suzukawa-eki?) on February 1 1889, when the section of the Tookaidoo Main Line connecting Shizuoka with Kōzu was completed. It became a terminus for the Gakunan Railway on November 18, 1949 and was renamed Yoshiwara Station (after Yoshiwara-juku on the old Tōkaidō on April 10, 1956. The present station building dates from 1970. Container freight services began operations from 1994.

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The Tookaidoo Yoshiwara Station has a single Island platform serving Track 1 and Track 2, which are on passing loops On the outside of either track are tracks to permit the through transit of express trains. The platform is connected to the station building by an overpass. The station building has automated ticket machines, TOICA automated turnstiles and a manned “Green Window” service counter. The Gakunan Yoshiwara Station has a bay platform with two tracks, only one of which is in normal daily use.

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FUJI STATION/富士駅 (not to be confused with Shin Fuji Station/新富士駅 used for Shinkansen trains only!)

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Location: Honchō 1-1, Fuji City, Shizuoka Prefecture(静岡県富士市本町1-1)GOOGLE MAP

In 1889, when the section of the Tōkaidō Main Line connecting Shizuoka with Kōzu was completed, stations were built at Suzukawa (Yoshiwara) and Iwabuchi (Fujikawa), with Kashima village in between without a train station. Due to the strong petition of the local residents, and political pressure applied by Oji Paper Company, who had established a paper mill nearby, a station was opened on April 21, 1909 and named “Fuji Station”. The terminus of the Minobu Line was established at Fuji Station on July 13, 1913. The station building was rebuilt in 1964. Container freight services began operations from 1994.

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The Fuji Station has three island platforms serving six tracks, which are connected each other an overpass, which leads to station building, which is also constructed over the tracks. The station building has automated ticket machines, TOICA automated turnstiles and a manned “Green Window” service counter.

FUJIKAWA STATION/富士川駅

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Location: Naka-no-go 1228-4, Fuji City, Shizuoka Prefecture(静岡県富士市中之郷1228-4)
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Fujikawa Station first opened as Iwabuchi Station (岩淵駅 Iwabuchi-eki) on February 1 1889, when the section of the Tookaidoo Main Line connecting Shizuoka with Kōzu was completed. The initial plan for the Tōkaidō Main Line was to construct stations in accord with the traditional 53 stages of the Tōkaidō road. However, in between Fujikawa-juku and Kanbara-juku there was a traditionally unnumbered intermediary post station where a branch road led to the pilgrimage location of Mount Minobu. It was decided to build a railroad station at this location, and to bypass nearby Kambara Town instead. This led to a predictable uproar from Kambara, so Kambara Station was built a year later, but at an inconvenient distance outside of town, so as to keep the spacing between stations fairly even. A station in the center of Kambara was not actually built until Shin-Kambara Station in 1968. Iwabuchi Station was renamed “Fujikawa” in 1970. Regularly scheduled freight services were discontinued in 1972, and all freight services by 1985.
Fujikawa Station has a single side platform serving Track 1 and an island platform serving Track 2 and Track 3, connected to the station building by an overpass. Track 2 is used for through transit of express trains. The station building has automated ticket machines, TOICA automated turnstiles and a manned “Green Window” service counter.

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SHIN KAMBARA STATION/新蒲原駅

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Location, Kambara 942, Shimizu Ku, Shizuoka City, Shizuoka Prefecture(静岡県清水区蒲原942)
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Shin-Kambara Station was opened on October 1, 1968, in response to a request by local citizens for a station closer to the center of town than the existing Kambara Station.
Shin-Kambara Station has two opposing side platform serving Track 1 and Track 2 The platforms are connected to the station building by an overpass. The station building has automated ticket machines, TOICA automated turnstiles and a manned “Green Window” service counter.

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ALONG THE OLD TOKAIDO ROAD: THE 53 STATIONS UKIYOE BY UTAGAWA HIROSHIGE ON PAVEMENT TILES IN FRONT OF Shin KAMBARA STATION, SHIMIZU KU, SHIZUOKA CITY!

KAMBARA STATION/蒲原駅

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Location, Kambara-Segizawa, Shimizu Ku, Shizuoka City, Shizuoka Prefecture(静岡県静岡市清水区蒲原堰沢)GOOGLE MAP

When the section of the Tookaidoo Main Line connecting Shizuoka with Kōzu was completed in 1889, the initial plan was to construct stations in accord with the traditional 53 stages of the Tokaido road. However, in between Yoshiwara-juku and Kanbara-juku there was a traditionally unnumbered intermediary post station where a branch road led to the pilgrimage location of Mount Minobu. It was decided to build a railroad station at this location, and to bypass nearby Kambara Town instead. This led to a predictable uproar from Kambara, so Kambara Station was built a year later, but at an inconvenient distance outside of town, so as to keep the spacing between stations fairly even. A station in the middle of Kambara Town was not actually built until Shin-Kambara Station in 1968. Regularly scheduled freight services were discontinued in 1972, and all freight services by 1985.
Kambara Station has a single side platform serving Track 1 and an island platform serving Track 2 and Track 3, connected to the station building by an overpass. Track 2 is used for through transit of express trains, as is Track 4 (without platform) to the outside of Track 3. The station building has automated ticket machines, TOICA automated turnstiles and a manned “Green Window” service counter.

YUI STATION/由比駅

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Location: Yui-Imajuku, Shimizu Ku, Shizuoka City, Shizuoka Prefecture(静岡県清水区由比今宿)GOOGLE MAP

Although local residents had petitioned for a station when the section of the Tōkaidō Main Line connecting Shizuoka with Hamamatsu was completed. Yui Station was opened in 1889, the low population and proximity to Kambara Station led to the petition being rejected. However, with the growing importance of agricultural products (green tea, mikan) and Yui’s importance as a fishing port, the request for a station was finally granted on April 15, 1916. Regularly scheduled freight service was discontinued in 1971.
Yui Station has two side platform serving Track 1 and Track 4, an island platform in between serving Track 2 and Track 3. The platforms are connected to the station building by an overpass. Track 1 and Track 4 are used only during peak hours to all express trains to pass. The station building has automated ticket machines, TOICA automated turnstiles and a manned “Green Window” service counter

OKITSU STATION/興津駅

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Location’ Okitsu-Nakamachi, Shimizu Ku, Shizuoka City, Shizuoka Prefecture(静岡県静岡市清水区興津中町)
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Okitsu Station was opened on February 1, 1889 when the section of the Tookaidoo Main Line connecting Shizuoka with Kōzu was completed. It is located near the site of Okitsu-juku on the old Tōkaidō. The area quickly developed into a summer seaside resort for the aristocracy, politicians and noted literary figures in the Meiji and Taisho periods. A noted resident of Okitsu was the genrō Saionji Kinmochi, whose practice was to order express trains to make a special unscheduled stop at Okitsu Station whenever he wanted to travel. The station building was rebuilt in 1930 and in 1981.
Between 1926 and 1964 Sodeshi Station was situated 2.4 km towards Shimizu Station, operating in the summer months to cater for beach goers. Sodeshi Station closed in 1971.
Okitsu Station has a single side platform serving Track 1 and an island platform serving Track 2 and Track 3, connected to the station building by an overpass. Track 3 is used for terminating services arriving from east and west, and also for services departing in both directions. The station building has automated ticket machines, TOICA automated turnstiles and a manned “Green Window” service counter.

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SHIMIZU STATION/清水駅

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Location’ Manago-machi, Shimizu Ku, Shizuoka City, Shizuoka Prefecture(静岡県静岡市清水区真砂町)
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Shimizu Station first opened as Ejiri Station (江尻駅 Ejiri-eki) on February 1, 1889, when the section of the Tōkaidō Main Line connecting Shizuoka with Kōzu was completed. It was named after Ejiri-juku, the 18th station of the historical Tōkaidō. In 1934 it was renamed Shimizu Station.
From 1916 the Shimizukoo Line ran as a branch line from Shimizu Station through the industrial port area of the town before terminating in Miho. In 1984 this line was torn up and replaced by a bus service. Regularly scheduled freight services were discontinued in 1984, and all freight services by 2001. Transfer to the Shizuoka-Shimizu Railway is available via Shin-Shimizu Station, a ten-minute walk from the east exit. The current station building was completed in June 2003.
Shimizu Station has a single island platform serving Track 1 and Track 2, connected to the station building by an overpass. The station building has automated ticket machines, TOICA automated turnstiles and a manned “Green Window” service counter.

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KUSANAGI STATION/草薙駅

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Location’ Kusanagi, Shimizu Ku, Shizuoka City, Shizuoka Prefecture(静岡市清水区草薙)
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A signal box was established on the site of the present Kusanagi Station on April 10, 1911. Kusanagi Station was opened on April 3, 1926. From 1930, the station had both passenger and freight operations; however, freight operations were discontinued from 1967. The current station building dates from 1973. Kusanagi Station serves the University of Shizuoka, Shizuoka Prefectural Museum of Art and Shizuoka Prefectural Central Library. The Shizuoka-Shimizu local railway line’s via Kusanagi Station is a three-minute walk away.
Kusanagi Station has two opposing side platforms serving Track 1 and Track 2, with headshunts, allowing for tracks for express trains to pass in between, and an overpass connecting the platforms. The station building has automated ticket machines, TOICA automated turnstiles and a manned “Green Window” service counter.

HIGASHI SHIZUOKA/東静岡駅

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Location: Naganuma, Aoi Ku, Shizuoka City, Shizuoka Prefecture(静岡市葵区長沼)
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Higashi-Shizuoka Station opened on October 30, 1998 as part of an urban renewal redevelopment of a portion of the former Higashi-Shizuoka Freight Terminal. A large-scale convention center next to the train station opened in 1999. These developments were intended to encourage further investment towards the east of Shizuoka City centre.
Higashi-Shizuoka Station has a single island platform serving two tracks, connected to the station building by an overpass with a moving walkway. The station building has automated ticket machines, TOICA automated turnstiles, and a staffed Midori no Madoguchi ticket office.

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SHIZUOKA STATION/静岡駅

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Location: Kurogane-chō, Aoi Ku, Shizuoka City, Shizuoka Prefecture(静岡県静岡市葵区黒金町)
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Shizuoka station first opened on February 1, 1889, when the section of the Tookaidoo Main Line connecting Shizuoka with Kōzu was completed. A grand opening ceremony had been planned, but on this day a huge fire destroyed over 1,000 buildings in downtown Shizuoka. Railroad Minister Inoue Masaru cancelled his planned visit, and later the same day, the town around Gotemba Station, also in Shizuoka Prefecture, burned down. The initial Shizuoka Station building was rebuilt in 1907 and again in 1935. The Tookaidoo Shinkansen platforms were opened in 1964. In 1967, freight operations were relocated from Shizuoka Station to Higashi-Shizuoka Station (the present-day Shizuoka Freight Terminal). The station underwent a massive rebuilding program from the late 1970s, with the Tōkaidō Main Line tracks elevated in 1979 to the same level as the Tookaidoo Shinkansen tracks, and the Parche shopping centre/new station building completed in 1981. From 2006 to 2008, major renovations took place inside and around the station, including the underground walkways to and from the station, and the Asty shopping and dining complexes adjoined to the station.
Shizuoka Station has four platforms serving six tracks. Two island platforms with Tracks 1–4 serve the Tōkaidō Main Line trains, and long distance night trains. These platforms are connected with the station concourse via an underpass and are also connected at the same level to the Tōkaidō Shinkansen platforms. The Shinkansen station consists of two opposing side platforms serving two tracks, with two central tracks for non-stop trains. The station building has automated ticket machines, TOICA automated turnstiles, and a manned “Green Window” service counter.

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ABEKAWA STATION/安倍川駅

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Location: Kamata, Suruga Ku, Shizuoka City, Shizuoka Prefecture(静岡市駿河区鎌田)GOOGLE MAP

Abekawa Station was opened on March 14, 1985 primarily as a commuter station serving Shizuoka city.
Abekawa Station has two side platforms serving Track 1 and Track 2, with the station building built on the overpass connecting the platforms. The station building has automated ticket machines, TOICA automated turnstiles and a manned “Green Window” service counter.

MOCHIMUNE STATION/用宗駅

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Location: 4-1 Mochimune-Shiroyama, Suruga Ku, Shizuoka City, Shizuoka Preefecture(静岡市駿河区用宗城山町4-1)
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A signal box was established at the site of present-day Mochimune Station on December 21, 1902. It was rebuilt as a station for both passenger and freight services on November 1, 1909. Regularly scheduled freight service was discontinued in 1974.
Mochimune Station has an island platform serving Track 2 and Track 3, and a side platform serving the seldom-used Track 1. The platforms are connected to the station building by an overpass. The station building has automated ticket machines, TOICA automated turnstiles and a manned “Green Window” service counter.

YAIZU STATION/焼津駅

TOKAIDO-LINE-YAIZU

Location: 1-1 Sakae, Yaizu City, Shizuoka Prefecture(静岡県島焼津市栄町一丁目1-1)
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Yaizu Station was opened on April 16, 1889 when the section of the Tookaidoo Main Line connecting Shizuoka with Hamamatsu was completed. Regularly scheduled freight service was discontinued in 1986.
Yaizu Station has a single island platform serving Track 1 and Track 2, connected to the station building by an overpass. The station building has automated ticket machines, TOICA automated turnstiles and a manned “Green Window” service counter.

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NISHI YAIZU STATION/西焼津駅

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Location: 112-1 Koyashiki-matsubara, Yaizu City, Shizuoka Prefecture(静岡県島焼津市小屋敷松原112-1)
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Nishiyaizu Station was opened on March 21, 1987 in response to requests from the local Yaizu city government. It is primary a commuter station, serving an industrial zone in Yaizu.
Nishiyaizu Station has two opposing side platforms serving Track 1 and Track 2. The platforms are connected to the station building by an overpass. The station building has automated ticket machines, TOICA automated turnstiles and a manned “Green Window” service counter.

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FUJIEDA STATION/藤枝駅

TOKAIDO-LINE-FUJIEDA

Location: Ekimae 1-chome 1, Fujieda City, Shizuoka Prefecture(静岡県藤枝市駅前一丁目1-1)
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Fujieda Station was opened on April 16, 1889 when the section of the Tookaidoo Main Line connecting Shizuoka with Hamamatsu was completed. The city of Fujieda did not exist at that time, and the station was located in Aoshima Village. On April 27, 1889, a senior official of the Imperial Household Ministry, Hida Hamagoro was killed while attempting to jump onto a departing express train from the platform of Fujieda Station. At the time, trains on the Tookaidoo Main Line had no toilets, and the accident led to their introduction on May 10 of the same year. Fujieda became an interchange station with the establishment of services by the Sunen Line (駿遠線 Sunen-sen) (the future Shizuoka Railway Company on November 16, 1913, and which opened a spur line to Ōigawa Town in 1914. Operations of the Shizuoka Railway were discontinued at Fujieda on October 1, 1970. Regularly scheduled freight service was discontinued in 1971.
Fujieda Station has an island platform serving Track 2 and Track 3, and a side platform serving the seldom-used Track 1. The platforms are connected to the station building by an overpass. The station building has automated ticket machines, TOICA automated turnstiles and a manned “Green Window” service counter.

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ROKUGO STATION/六合駅

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Location: Doetsu 1-chome 16, Shimada City, Shizuoka Prefecture(静岡県島田市道悦一丁目16)
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Rokugō Station was opened on April 26, 1986 in response to requests from the local Shimada city government.
Rokugō Station has two opposing side platforms serving Track 1 and Track 2 which are on headshunts, allowing for tracks for express trains to pass in between. The platforms are connected to the station building by an overpass. The station building has automated ticket machines, TOICA automated turnstiles and a manned “Green Window” service counter.

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SHIMADA STATION/島田駅

TOKAIDO-LINE-SHIMADA

Location: Sakae-chō, Shimada City, Shizuoka Prefecture(静岡県島田市栄町)
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Shimada Station was opened on April 16, 1889 when the section of the Tōkaidō Main Line connecting Shizuoka with Hamamatsu was completed. Regularly scheduled freight service was discontinued in 1984, but continued on a charter service until 1993.
Shimada Station has an island platform serving Track 1 and Track 2, and a side platform serving the seldom-used Track 3. The platforms are connected to the station building by an overpass. The station building has automated ticket machines, TOICA automated turnstiles and a manned “Green Window” service counter.

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KANAYA STATION/金谷駅

TOKAIDO-LINE-KANAYA

Location: Kanaya, Shimada City, Shizuoka Prefecture(静岡県島田市金谷)
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Kanaya Station was opened on May 16, 1890, a year after when the section of the Tōkaidō Main Line connecting Shizuoka with Hamamatsu was completed. The Ōigawa Railway service began on June 10, 1927. Regularly scheduled freight service was discontinued in 1971.
JR Kanaya Station has a two opposing side platforms serving Track 1 and Track 2 which are on headshunts, allowing for tracks for express trains to pass in between. The platforms are connected to the station building by an underpass. The station building has automated ticket machines, TOICA automated turnstiles and a manned “Green Window” service counter.

The adjacent Ōigawa Kanaya Station has a single side platform. The platform is equipped with Selective Door Operation, as trains longer than four cars in length are too long for the platform. The station originally was built with a terminal headshunt, which is no longer in existence.

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KIKUGAWA STATION/菊川駅

TOKAIDO-LINE-KIKUGAWA

Location: Horinouchi, Kikugawa City, Shizuoka Prefecture(静岡県菊川市堀之内)
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Kikugawa Station was opened on April 16, 1889 when the section of the Tookaidoo Main Line connecting Shizuoka with Hamamatsu was completed. It was originally named Horinouchi Station (堀ノ内駅 Horinouchi-eki). It was renamed Kikugawa on April 10, 1956. Regularly scheduled freight service was discontinued in 1971.
Kikugawa Station has a single side platform serving Track 1 and an island platform serving Track 2 and Track 3, connected to the station building by an overpass. Track 1 is used only during peak hours. The station building has automated ticket machines, TOICA automated turnstiles and a manned “Green Window” service counter.

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KAKEGAWA STATION/掛川駅

TOKAIDO-LINE-KAKEGAWA

Location: 1-1 Minami 1-chome, Kakegawa City, Shizuoka Prefecture(静岡県掛川市南1-1-1)
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Kakegawa Station was first opened on April 16, 1889 when the section of the Tookaidoo Main Line connecting Shizuoka with Hamamatsu was completed. In 1935 the first section of the Tenryū Hamanako Line opened, with Kakegawa Station as its terminus. Regular freight service was discontinued in 1984. On March 13, 1988 the Tōkaidō Shinkansen platforms opened on the south side of the station.

TOKAIDO-LINE-KAKEGAWA-NORTH

Kakegawa Station North exit

JR Kakegawa Station has five platforms serving eight tracks. The Tookaidoo Main Line Track 1 is served by a side platform connected to the main station building’s north exit and the Tenryū Hamanako Line station. It is used for departing both east and west. Track 2 and Track 3 are served by an island platform. Both platforms are connected to the station building by an underpass, which also connects to the two elevated side platforms used by the Shinkansen (Track 4 and Track 5). The north side of the station is a wooden structure dating from 1940. The station building has automated ticket machines, TOICA automated turnstiles and a manned “Green Window” service counter.

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AINO STATION/愛野駅

TOKAIDO-LINE-AINO

Location: 691-8 Aino, Fukuroi City, Shizuoka Prefecture(静岡県袋井市愛野691-8)
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Aino Station was opened on April 22, 2001 in conjunction with the 2002 FIFA World Cup as the location closest to the Shizuoka “Ecopa” Stadium.
Aino Station has a single island platform, connected by an overpass on which the two-story station building by is constructed. The station building has automated ticket machines, TOICA automated turnstiles and a manned “Midori no Madoguchi” service counter.

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FUKUROI STATION/袋井駅

TOKAIDO-LINE-FUKUROI

Location: 2025-5 Takao, Fukuroi City, Shizuoka Prefecture(静岡県袋井市高尾2025-5)
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Fukuroi Station was opened on April 16, 1889 when the section of the Tōkaidō Main Line connecting Shizuoka with Hamamatsu was completed. From 1902-1962, it was an interchange station which also served the Akiha Line of the Shizuoka Railway. Regularly scheduled freight service was discontinued on January 21, 1984.
Fukuroi Station has two island platforms, connected by an overpass. The outside tracks, Track 1 and Track 4, are not in regular use, except during peak times in the summer festival season. The station building has automated ticket machines, TOICA automated turnstiles and a manned “Midori no Madoguchi” service counter.

IWATA STATION/磐田駅

TOKAIDO-LINE-IWATA

Location: 633-1 Nakaizumi, Iwata City, Shizuoka Prefecture(静岡県磐田市中泉633-1)
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Iwata Station was built as Nakaizumi Station (中泉駅 Nakaizumi-eki) on April 16, 1889 when the section of the Tookaidoo Main Line connecting Shizuoka with Hamamatsu was completed. It was renamed “Iwata Station” on October 10, 1942. The station building was rebuilt in 1915, 1957, and 2000. Regularly scheduled freight service was discontinued on February 26, 1996; however, occasional freight trains operated by the Japan Freight Railway Company stopped at a rail siding at Iwata to service the industrial zone to the east of the station.

A large bus terminal was established at the south exit of the station in 2006.

A statue of the local football club Júbilo Iwata’s mascot, Júbilo-kun, modeled on the black-tailed flycatcher, stands prominently in front of the station’s north exit. Buses at the stop nearby provide service to the club’s stadium, Yamaha Stadium, on game days.

Iwata Station has a side platform serving Track 1, which is an infrequently used auxiliary platform, and an island platform serving Track 2 and Track 3. The two platforms are connected by an overpass. The station building has automated ticket machines, TOICA automated turnstiles and a manned “Green Window” service counter.

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TOYODA CHOO SATION/豊田町駅

TOKAIDO-LINE-TOYODA-CHOO

Location: 490 Tatsuno, Iwata City, Shizuoka Prefecture(静岡県磐田市立野490)GOOGLE MAP

Toyodachō Station is a relatively new station on the Tookaidoo Main Line, having been opened on December 14, 1991 in Toyoda town, Shizuoka, prior to its merger with nearby Iwata City in 2005.
Toyodachō Station has two opposing side platforms connected by an overpass. The station building has automated ticket machines, TOICA automated turnstiles and a manned “Green Window” service counter.

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TENRYUUGAWA STATION?天竜川駅

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Location: Tenryūgawa-chō, Higashi Ku, Hamamatsu City, Shizuoka Prefecture(静岡県浜松市東区天龍川町)GOOGLE MAP

Tenryūgawa Station was opened on July 10, 1898 for both passenger and freight services. Regularly scheduled freight service was discontinued on March 15, 1972; however, occasional freight trains operated by the Japan Freight Railway Company continued to use the station until April 1, 2006.
Tenryūgawa Station has two island platforms, one serving Track 1, which is an infrequently used auxiliary platform, and Track 2. The other island platform serves Track 3, and Track 4, which is also an infrequently used auxiliary platform. The two platforms are connected by an overpass. The station building has automated ticket machines, TOICA automated turnstiles and a manned “Green Window” service counter.

HAMAMATSU STATION/浜松駅

TOKAIDO-LINE-HAMAMATSU

Location: 6-2 Sunayama-chō, Naka Ku, Hamamatsu City, Shizuoka Prefecture(静岡県浜松市中区砂山町6-2)
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Hamamatsu Station was officially opened on September 1, 1888. The station building was rebuilt in 1926, but this burned down during the Bombing of Hamamatsu in World War II. The station was rebuilt in 1948. On October 1, 1964, the Tōkaidō Shinkansen began operations, serving Hamamatsu. Freight operations were relocated to the Nishi-Hamamatsu Freight Depot to the west in 1971. The station underwent a massive rebuilding program from the late 1970s, with the Tōkaidō Main Line tracks elevated in 1979 to the same level as the Tōkaidō Shinkansen tracks, and the “MayOne” shopping centre/new station building completed in 1981.
Hamamatsu Station has two island platforms serving Tracks 1-4 for the Tōkaidō Shinkansen, which are connected by an underpass a central concourse. At the same level as the Shinkansen tracks are the two island platforms serving Tracks 5-8 of the Tōkaidō Main Line. The station building has automated ticket machines, TOICA automated turnstiles and a manned “Midori no Madoguchi” ticket counter.

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TAKATSUKA STATION/高塚駅

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Location: Takatsuka-cho, Minami Ku, Hamamatsu City, Shizuoka Prefecture(浜松市南区高塚町)
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A signal box was established at the location of modern Takatsuka Station on March 31, 1911. This became a full train station on July 1, 1929. Regularly scheduled freight service was discontinued on April 24, 1971; however, occasional freight trains continued to use a shunt from the station to a nearby Suzuki Motors engine plant until October 1, 1983.
Takatsuka Station has one side platform serving Track 1, and one island platforms, serving Track 2 and Track 3 (which was formerly dedicated to freight trains and is no longer in use. The two platforms are connected by an overpass. The station building has automated ticket machines, TOICA automated turnstiles and a manned “Green Window” service counter.

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MAISAKA STATION/舞阪駅

TOKAIDO-LINE-MAISAKA

Location Magoori, Nishi Ku, Hamamatsu City, Shizuoka Prefecture(浜松市西区馬郡町)
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Maisaka Station was opened on September 1, 1888 when the section of the Tōkaidō Main Line connecting Hamamatsu Station with Ōbu Station was completed. It was originally named Magoori Station (馬郡駅 Magoori-eki?). It was renamed Maisaka on December 1, 1888, but the kanji spelling of its name assumed its present form only in 1940. Regularly scheduled freight service was discontinued in 1971.
Maisaka Station has a side platform serving Track 1 and an island platform serving Track 2 and Track 3, connected to the station building by an overpass. Track 1 is used only during peak hours. The station building has automated ticket machines, TOICA automated turnstiles and a manned “Green Window” service counter.

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BENTENJIMA STATION/弁天島駅

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Location: Maisaka-cho, Bentenjima, Nishi Ku, Hamamatsu City, Shizuoka Prefecture(浜松市西区舞阪町弁天島)GOOGLE MAP

Bentenjima Station was opened on July 11, 1906 when the section of the Tookaidoo Main Line connecting Hamamatsu Station with Ōbu Station was completed. It was originally a seasonal station, open only during the summer months for visitors to the nearby beach resorts. It became a permanent station on September 1, 1916. Regularly scheduled freight service was discontinued in 1971.
Bentenjima Station has a single island platform serving Track 1 and Track 2. The platforms are unusually wide, and the station building is located underneath the platforms. The station building is manned only during peak hours and has automated ticket machines, TOICA automated turnstiles and a manned “Green Window” service counter. The station building also fronts Japan National Route 1 highway.

ARAI MACHI STATION/新居町駅

TOKAIDO-LINE-ARAIMACHI

Location: Araichō-Arai, Kosai City, Shizuoka Prefecture(静岡県湖西市新居町新居)
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On September 1, 1888 the section of the Tōkaidō Main Line connecting Hamamatsu Station with Ōbu Station was completed. Araimachi Station was established on January 10, 1915 for both passenger service and freight. Freight service was discontinued on April 26, 1971.
Araimachi Station has a side platform serving Track 1, and an island platform serving Track 2 and Track 3. The platforms are connected by an overpass. The station building has automated ticket machines, TOICA automated turnstiles and a manned “Green Window” service counter. However, the station is not manned during early morning and late night hours.

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WASHIZU STATION/鷲津駅

TOKAIDO-LINE-WASHIZU

Location: 1295-14 Washizu, osai City Shizuoka Prefecture(静岡県湖西市鷲津1295-14)
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On September 1, 1888 the section of the Tookaidoo Main Line connecting Hamamatsu Station with Ōbu Station was completed, and a rail siding was established at the site of present-day Washizu Station. As the area was completely rural at the time, stops were discontinued from August 1892; however, due to the strong petition by the surrounding villages, a station was established on January 10, 1915 for both passenger service and freight. Freight service was discontinued on April 26, 1971.
Washizu Station has a side platform serving Track 1, and an island platform serving Track 2 and Track 3. The platforms are connected by an overpass. The station building has automated ticket machines, TOICA automated turnstiles and a manned “Green Window” service counter.

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SHINJOHARA STATION/新所原駅

TOKAIDO-LINE-SHINJOHARA

Location: 3-4-1 Shinjohara, Kosai City, Shizuoka Prefecture(静岡県湖西市新所原三丁目4-1)GOOGLE MAP

On September 1, 1888 the section of the Tōkaidō Main Line connecting Hamamatsu Station with Ōbu Station was completed, and a signal box was established at the site of present-day Shinjohara Station on February 13, 1936. With the establishment of the Futamata Line (the future Tenryū Hamanako Line), a station was established on December 1, 1936 for both passenger and freight services. Freight service was discontinued on April 26, 1971.
The JR Central station has a side platform serving track 1, and an island platform serving tracks 2 and 3, but track 3 is seldom used. The platforms are connected by an overpass. The station building has automated ticket machines, TOICA automated turnstiles and a manned “Midori no Madoguchi” service counter.

The Tenryū Hamanako Line Station is a terminal station and has a single side platform serving Track 1. The station building is a two-story structure located to the east of the single-story JR building.

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