Category Archives: Shimada City

Fudou No Taki Waterfalls in Kawane Hon Cho, Shimada City!

FUDO-NO-TAKI-2

The other day, in a frigid morning my good friend Mr. Osamu Kurosawa, 黒澤脩さん, A true historian of Shizuoka prefecture took to another site of note in the back country of Shimada City, more precisely to a Waterfalls called “Fudou no Taki/不動の滝” located in a natural park called “Fudo No Taki Waterfalls Natural Park Auto Camp/不動の滝自然広場オートキャンプ場”!
As it was winter, we were interfering with anybody!

FUDO-NO-TAKI-3

This very camp is in the center of a natural park forest where many bird watchers gather all year round!

FUDO-NO-TAKI-4

The park is well-equipped and even has a washroom for wheel chair users!

FUDO-NO-TAKI-5

The City of Shimada looks after the site and is very strict about its cleanliness and safety!

FUDO-NO-TAKI-6

They are particularly touchy about bush fires!

FUDO-NO-TAKI-8

The entrance to the way leading to the waterfalls!

FUDO-NO-TAKI-9

The lane is following a stream among the rocks. In summer it could easily become a torrent!

FUDO-NO-TAKI-7

On the way there is sight typical of noted waterfalls in Japan. Can you guess?

FUDO-NO-TAKI-10

Okay, you might not be able to read the Japanese!
It the location of a small Shinto Shrine!

FUDO-NO-TAKI-11

“Fudou Shinto Shrine”!

Clap your hands twice to wake up the sleepy deity!

FUDO-NO-TAKI-12

Going back to the mountain trail through the torii/shinto shrine sacred portal!

FUDO-NO-TAKI-13

Good exercise after the revelries of the night before!

FUDO-NO-TAKI-14

Stopping on the way for a look at the stream!

FUDO-NO-TAKI-15

Still in winter as shown by the ice!

FUDO-NO-TAKI-16

C’mon, guys!

FUDO-NO-TAKI-17

Icicles!

It was still a few degrees below zero, but this a great place to cool down in Shimada stifling summers!

FUDO-NO-TAKI-18

The last bridge before the waterfalls!

FUDO-NO-TAKI-19

Looking back down the stream!

FUDO-NO-TAKI-20

The Fudou Waterfalls!

FUDO-NO-TAKI-21

There is not so much water running down in winter, but it can become a wet experience in summer!

FUDO-NO-TAKI-22

Great possibilities for photographers!

Fudo No Taki Waterfalls Natural Park Auto Camp
428-0304 Shizuoka Prefecture, Shimada City, Kawane Hon Cho, Shimoizumi, 1122
Tel: 0547-56-1600

不動の滝自然広場オートキャンプ場
住所: 〒428-0304 静岡県榛原郡 川根本町下泉 1122
電話:0547-56-1600

HOMEPAGE (Japanese + some English)
FACEBOOK (Japanese)

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

So Good Sushi Restaurant in Nice France
Navigating Nagoya by Paige, Shop with Intent by Debbie, BULA KANA in Fiji, Kraemer’s Culinary blog by Frank Kraemer in New York,Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pie
rre.Cuisine
, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento, Hapabento, Kitchen Cow, Lunch In A Box, Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Ohayo Bento

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Ichi For The Michi by Rebekah Wilson-Lye in Tokyo, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in Kansai by Nevitt Reagan!
ABRACADABREW, Magical Craftbeer from Japan
-Whisky: Nonjatta: All about whisky in Japan by Stefan Van Eycken
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Non gastronomy must-see sites by Shizuoka Residents

Advertisements

Kura: Traditional Japanese Warehouses in Shizuoka Prefecture 39: Katsuyama Family Home in Kawane Cho, Shimada City!

“Kura” (in Japanese 蔵 or 倉) means “warehouse” or “Storehouse”.
In traditional Japan, especially during the Edo Era, as most of buildings and urba/village structures were made of wood, fires were the bane of society by and large.
However well-protected a fire would consume a house or buildings and all its properties within minutes.
Hence a special building or warehouse was needed to protect goods and properties against such a catastrophe.
But erecting a storehouse solely made of concrete, stones and some metal cost a vast amount of silver and gold and only rich merchants and nobility could afford them. Even castles could not be built entirely of stone then.

KURA-KAWANE-KATSUYAMA-1

The other my good friend Mr. Osamu Kurosawa/黒澤脩さん, a respected historian in our Prefecture took me to a house hidden in Kawane-Cho, not far from Ieyama, in Shimada City, to show me a splendid kura!

KURA-KAWANE-KATSUYAMA-2

Actually, the kura is only one building inside a vast property owned by the same family for hundred of years.
You must remember that in Edo Era, Shimada City was one of the most important cities in the whole Central Japan because it was a border City by the Ooi River controlling all traffic between Edo/Tokyo and Osaka!

KURA-KAWANE-KATSUYAMA-3

the name of the family owning the vast property is Katsuyama/勝山!

KURA-KAWANE-KATSUYAMA-4

Any rich landowner or person of great importance lived in a large house with servants quarters and a kura to store and protect rice and valuables in particular against fires and natural disasters!
The lady we met inside the house first kindly agree to let me take photographs of the warehouse under the gentle request of my friend, Osamu!

KURA-KAWANE-KATSUYAMA-5

Actually the kura has just been restored by its owner as you can see with the perfectly working windows!

KURA-KAWANE-KATSUYAMA-6

It actually took him more than a year to complete the job!

KURA-KAWANE-KATSUYAMA-7

The “pegs” are still properly aligned, meaning that the walls haven’t been affected by the depredations of time!

KURA-KAWANE-KATSUYAMA-8

The whole property ought to be used as a locale for historical movies or TV programs!

KURA-KAWANE-KATSUYAMA-9

Actually it should designated as a cultural asset and it should be the government’s task and duty to look after it!

KURA-KAWANE-KATSUYAMA-10

The pegs and metal links with the upper roof are still in great repair, meaning the uper roof is stable!

KURA-KAWANE-KATSUYAMA-11

This is the first time I see such a big “oni gara/goblin pinion tile”! That only should become a cultural asset!

KURA-KAWANE-KATSUYAMA-12

A closer view at the upstairs window!

KURA-KAWANE-KATSUYAMA-13

The roofing must be hard to maintain in good repair!

KURA-KAWANE-KATSUYAMA-14

A “rear” view!

KURA-KAWANE-KATSUYAMA-15

The other “oni gara”!

KURA-KAWANE-KATSUYAMA-16

The door and lock dating back from the Edo period!

KURA-KAWANE-KATSUYAMA-17

Heavy door panels had to be pulled in to close the door!

KURA-KAWANE-KATSUYAMA-18

Taken back to another era!

KURA-KAWANE-KATSUYAMA-19

I marveled at how it can have been preserved!

KURA-KAWANE-KATSUYAMA-20

The ancient “namako” design also is a good enough reason to designate it as a cultural asset as very recently even the Government was heard moaning about their disappearance! In fact, it is the first time I saw a pillar decorated in “namako” design!

KURA-KAWANE-KATSUYAMA-21

Actually the lower roof angle had to be propped up!

It is about time that the Government made a move!

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

So Good Sushi Restaurant in Nice France
Navigating Nagoya by Paige, Shop with Intent by Debbie, BULA KANA in Fiji, Kraemer’s Culinary blog by Frank Kraemer in New York,Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pie
rre.Cuisine
, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento, Hapabento, Kitchen Cow, Lunch In A Box, Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Ohayo Bento

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Ichi For The Michi by Rebekah Wilson-Lye in Tokyo, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in Kansai by Nevitt Reagan!
ABRACADABREW, Magical Craftbeer from Japan
-Whisky: Nonjatta: All about whisky in Japan by Stefan Van Eycken
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Non gastronomy must-see sites by Shizuoka Residents

Sumatakyo Hot Springs in Shimada City, Shizuoka Prefecture!

The Missus and I finally found a couple of days off work to go to a favourite destination of ours: Hotsprings.
Shizuoka Prefecture is probably the most famous region in Japan for such a venue.
Hotels, Ryokans (inns) and Minshuku (Pensions) can wildly vary in prices, services and meals served, but my other half is a wizard (sorry, witch!) when it comes to find out the best deal out of the Internet.
She planned the whole trip as my experience has taught me it is better this way in spite of all the grumbling (why do I have to do everything?….).

Kanaya Railway Station, Oi River Railroad (minuscule!)

We left Shizuoka City (Higashi Shizuoka Station) at 09:56 and reached Kanaya Station at 10:34 using the Tokaido Railway Line.

Before buying our tickets, we checked with the small food stand at Kanaya Oi River Railroad Station (next to Kanaya Station) as they always sell good local ekiben/railway line bento!

Large signs across the track made sure you know your destination!

We ignored the SL train as we were planning to board it on our return and instead used the diesel-pulled train. No need to say that all trains along the Oi River Railroad track are crowded with train buffs on week-ends!

That railroad is mainly a single-track line except inside stations (and not all at that!).

My bento box!

It even contained a postcard!

The food inside!

The bento chosen by the Missus!

The food inside!

Kawane Green tea to washi it down. Don’t forget that Shizuoka Prefecture produces more than 45% of all green tea in Japan and the area we are going to cross on our way, Kawane, is the major green tea producing area!

Although the train runs along the Oi River between montains, thereis plenty of place for (tea) farming.

Tea fields everywhere!

This is the season and farmers are busy even on Sunday! You will find very few recreation spaces there as farmers are just too tired at the end of the day!

The Oi River has always been a major river in Japan! For once the weather was clement!

Wherever you go in Jpaan, you will discover ball parks where Elementary School kids are eager to show off their new uniforms!

We left Kanaya at 10:49 to reach Senzu Station, the last station for that particular train. Nice natural decoration!

A view of Senzu Station, which stands pretty high in the South Japanese Alps!

We had arrived at Senzu Station 12:04 and still had sometime before taking the bus to Sumatakyo at 13:30. We were getting a bit hungry. Luckily we noticed a gentleman grilling/bbq-ing large yamame!

Yamame (山女 or “Mountain Woman” in Japanese!) is a kind of trout, either called Japanese trout or Seema.

One can either eat wild ones or pond-raised ones. These fat samples are raised in local ponds fed with fresh mountain waters. Griiled with salt/shoyaki/塩焼き, they are succulent. You can eat the skin, too!

Almost “next door” to Senzu Station stands a very interesting museum dedicated to sound in their many form, natural or devised.
The place is called Otogi No Sato/Sound Village.
Check their (Japanese) HOMEPAGE.
I was particularly interested in the “percussion faces”.

Long teeth!

Another one for a music-loving dentist?

Another one for hard hitting!

We finally reached our destination Suikoen Spa Hotel at 14:10.
Now, who is that lady?
Check the Hotel Homepage for more information (Japanese)!

I can assure you they will never lack water to turn that wheel!

Hotel lobby sitting room.

The lobby seen from the inside courtyard.

The same from another angle.

A small but scenic courtyard, indeed, with the nearby wooded mountains.

A small carp pond, naturally!

A traditional irori/囲炉裏 with a real charcoal fire!

As we still had plenty of time until dinner (served at 18:00, a bit early by Western standards!), we took the opportunity to visit the locality!

A traditonal minshuku/民宿 or pension.

Narrow streets with plenty of verdant nature!

Rivers and waterfalls running through the village!

Traditional Houses and shops.
And then it was time for dinner, but that is for Part 2!

Check the Hotel Homepage for more information (Japanese)!

Now, how much did we pay for one night at Suikoen Hotel, thebest one in Sumatakyo, lost in the southern Japan Alps with full dinner, breakfast and onsen bath/hotsprings bath?
130 US $ each, not bad!

Meals are taken early in Japanese hotsprings hotels.
Ours was launched at 6:00 p.m.!
A plate of zensai/appetizers was waiting for us.

And the procession of appetizers continued with stewed cold chicken and boiled vegetables,

yam, pickled wasabi and myoga ginger,

grilled yamame, you can eat the whole!

Japanese-style bbq with pork and vegetables and miso paste,

20 minutes later!

Shika tataki/Seared venison sashimi (the venison comes from wild deer in the nearvy mountains!),

an interesting “sashimi plate”: gomadofu/sesame tofu, salmon and konnyaku/devil’s tongue tuber jelly mixed with local green tea!

I don’t know too much baout this one. All I know is that it was made with azuki beans, yam and tofu. Very hearty!

Chinese-style fried salmon with sweet and sour sauce,

tsukemono, Japanese pickles,

Yamasemi (Mountain Kingfisher) white wine from Nagano Precture (extra fee!),

Freshly steamed rice is brought inside a double-lid pot,

so simple and delicious!

Miso soup, naturally,

Kawane Green Tea (did I tell you that Shizuoka Prefecture produces more than 45% of all green tea in Japan?)!

And Kawane green tea jelly for dessert!

The entrance of the hot baths…

The noren/curtain barring the view of the hot baths for men.
”男” means “men”. Don’t make a mistake!

The noren/curtain barring the view of the hot baths for women/ladies.
”女” means “women”. Don’t make a mistake again!

The “venues are switched every 12 hours. Do be careful and check! LOL

A view of the “make-up” room.

The indoor bath.

Scrub yourself before entering any bath!

Rotenburo/露天風呂/outdoors bath. A bit small, I must admit!

The relaxation room by the outdoors bath.
Do not trust the scales!

We did dip in the baths the next day before and after breakfast.
The breakfast was the all you can eat self-service style, both European and Japanese style. Above was my first helping (European).

I was really hungry after all the walking the day before (and more coming on that day!), I couldn’t help wolfing down another, Japanese-style, breakfast!

All considered, a good enough hotel, good steady food and very reasonable. Definitely recommended!

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

So Good Sushi Restaurant in Nice France
Navigating Nagoya by Paige, Shop with Intent by Debbie, BULA KANA in Fiji, Kraemer’s Culinary blog by Frank Kraemer in New York,Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pie
rre.Cuisine
, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento, Hapabento, Kitchen Cow, Lunch In A Box, Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Ichi For The Michi by Rebekah Wilson-Lye in Tokyo, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in Kansai by Nevitt Reagan!
ABRACADABREW, Magical Craftbeer from Japan
-Whisky: Nonjatta: All about whisky in Japan by Stefan Van Eycken
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Non gastronomy must-see sites by Shizuoka Residents

HIGHOCTANE/HAIOKU by Nick Itoh in Shizuoka City

The 3 Big Shimada City Festivals in 2016 and Beyond 3: Shimada Oo Matsuri-島田大祭

The Shimada Oo Matsuri-島田大祭, also called Shimada Obi Matsuri-島田帯祭, is a rare Festival as it is held only every three years, therefore 2016 will be most important for Festivals in Shimada City when all three big Festivals will be held, an occurrence one can enjoy only every 6 years!

Thanks to the Daimyou Gyouretsu/大名行列/Lord Parade featuring the sash saber dancers, it has been officially named one of the so-called three most unusual festivals in Japan!
It will be held in 2016 on Saturday, October 8th, Sunday October 9th and Monday October 10th (the latter being a national Holiday)!

This also becomes an incredible chance for photographers who will not have enough of the three days that the Festival lasts!
Let me at least give them an introductory guide to expand at will for superb photography!

“Happi/半被” or Festival Coats!

“Happi/半被” could be translated as half coats and which are usually worn at Festivals or special occasions to show to which group you belong!
But there are also purely artistic Happi!

SN3O5044

A classical design with a lion!

SN3O5042

Another classical happi with a prawn motif at the top!

SN3O5039

A more artistic happi with a stylized Kabuki Theater Face Painting!

SN3O5038

Samurai Fight!

SN3O5025

The broken mask of a Goblin/Oni called “Han Ya” in Noh Theater!

SN3O4963

River-crossing Lady! That is the very Ooi River in Shimada City!

SN3O4962

A Phoenix, a Winged Horse/Pegasus and a Turtle in front of a red Mount Fuji!

Faces of Men!

SN3O4965

Behave yourself at Festival or I’ll get at you!

SN3O4922

My good friend Hisatsugu Umehara/梅原詞さん who has been helping the fourth district (there are no less than 7 organizing the whole festival!) for the 7th time in a row! (Multiply by 3=18 years!)

SN3O4966

Don’t touch the sake without my permission!

SN3O4973

One cup of sake per person only! Understood?

SN3O4975

Easy hairstyles?

SN3O4977

This chap would have been a hit with Medieval European ladies!

SN3O4978

When you grow older, whiter and less abundant, sport a beard!

SN3O5020

11 am and already happily drinking!
Great smiles!

Faces of Ladies!

SN3O5041

The cutest ladies at the festival? Definitely the most serious about it!

SN3O5075

Flaming hair!

SN3O5040

These two ladies selling at a food stand were certainly having a good time!

SN3O4969

The color of their hair is a sign of their seriousness!

SN3O4930

We’ll see many more of these with such grand hairstyles!

SN3O4908

Looking after the younger generation.

SN3O5090

My favorite picture!

SN3O5092

Tigerish hairstyle?

SN3O5120

I’m so bleeding tired…..

The Kids!

SN3O5017

The best picture of the day!

SN3O5036

Teaching by example?

SN3O4909

So well-behaved!

SN3O5101

Aren’t we beautiful?

SN3O5100

These are tough kids who had to walk no less than 1.7 km a day for 3 days in a row!
Also very tough for the parents who walked behind in holiday finery!

SN3O5069

Note the mothers following their kids in 30 degrees Celsius heat!

SN3O5070

Horse Lord !

SN3O5058

Horse Lord !

SN3O5018

The festival chariots also served as dancing stages where incredibly clad kids form 4 to 9 years old performed traditional Japanese dances to the sound of instruments and singers’ voices!

SN3O5028

The dancers had to be carried on a strong man’s back up onto and down form the stages!

SN3O5015

Dancing genius!

The Food Stands!

SN3O5003

Brochettes, brochettes, brochettes!

At any Festival worth its salt the Japanese take for granted what becomes nothing less than a giant BBQ!

SN3O4987

Charcoal-grilled “ayame” trouts!

SN3O4988

Naturally, sausages are a must!

SN3O4989

It is also a good time to sample specialties from all over Japan: Oita (Kyushu) style stir-fried chicken!

SN3O4990

Hiroshima-style noodles, pasta, Yaki, Okonmiyaki!

SN3O4991

Yakitori!

SN3O4994

Tai Yaki (seabream-shaped pancakes containing anko/sweet meat beans) for the kids and sweet teeth!

SN3O4997

Spicy stir-fried chicken!

SN3O4999

Osaka-style takoyaki/dumplings containing octopus!

SN3O5005

These particular charcoal-grilled sausages and pork brochetttes stand had a constant 20-people queue stretching in front of it!

SN3O5008

Oden! A shizuoka specialty!

SN3O5014

Kawane green tea!
Shizuoka produces more than 45% of all green tea in Japan!

The “Clash” of the Chariots!

SN3O4964

Make way!

Do come early in the day to watch the clash of the chariots (not real floats) and all its fun!

SN3O4924

Dai Nikai Yatai/Second district Chariot

The Chariots/Yatai seen during the Shimada Obi Festival are chariots more than floats.
Shimada City counts seven districts, Dai/第 Ichi, Ni, san, Yon, Go, Roku and Nana Kai/街.
The first six districts look after their own chariot which is also used as theater platform where plays are enacted by local kids.
The seventh district is in charge of the Lord Parade/Daimyou Gyooretsu!

SN3O4926

The “movers”!

Although the chariots are mounted on wheels, these same wheels are more of wood and metal and are fixed to the frame. They do not roll!
One main reason for that is that a free-wheeling chariot is just too unstable to control.
Hence the armies of “movers”!

SN3O4928

Now, this is tough work to ensure three days in a row!

Each “mover” is armed with a long pole made of a solid tree trunk cut at a slant at its base.
The poles will be used to lift and push the chariots from any side as thick tree trunks are fixed to the bottom frame just above ground!

SN3O4927

Whereas at other times of the day the chariots will become the theater stages, in the morning they are paraded along the main street to the sounds of drum and Japanese fife players sitting inside!

SN3O4931

The rope pullers of the Dai Ni Kai!

On the other hand teams of young men will pull the chariots with long ropes to help move forward.
But when it comes to moving sideways the “movers” will take care of the show!

SN3O4935

The “cheerleaders” standing on the roof, sticks in hands!
Notice that they are all light-weight!

 

SN3O4943

Start the drums!

SN3O4945

The “clash” is beginning!
Actually it is all carefully planned banter.
The two chariots “riders” will scream at each other to leave the way or move aside.
There will be no real fight in spite of the very “serious” faces of the participants.
But in the rare occasion when the chariots do hit each other by accident older members will immediately run between the handlers and shout them away from each other in no uncertain words!
The police is invisible at such times and the citizens handle themselves!

SN3O4937

The “riders” guiding the “pullers” and Movers” sideways to the sounds of sticks and whistles!

SN3O4950

C’mon guys! Let’s go with it!

SN3O4949

Move aside, will ya!

SN3O4952

It is the turn of the riders to frantically scream at each other while directing their respective chariots!

SN3O4954

Very little leeway, I can assure you!

SN3O4955

All the time the fans’ fans in a frenzy!

SN3O4964

Safely through, but look at those “stares”!

Daimyou Gyouretsu-The Lord Parade!

SN3O5072

The Sabres Dancer!

The finale of the day(s)!

SN3O5046

The Daimyou Gyouretsu/大名行列 is the sole responsibility of the Dai Nana Kai/第七街/Seventh District and comes last after all the chariots, stage dancers and parades have come through since 8:30 a.m. They usually start between 13:00 and 14:30 depending on the day.

SN3O5048

They are very strict about the organisation and young members ensure that there isn’t the slightest impediment.

SN3O5049

The “leaders” are extremely proud of their prerogatives, even by Japanese standards.
This is after all the aristocratic part of the festival and in Edo times they were far more obvious about their power and authority as the local Lord and his retainers paraded for real!

SN3O5051

The lancers!

SN3O5068

The Lord’s mark of authority carried inside portable boxes! Heavy stuff actually!

SN3O5066

The archers!

SN3O5057

Kids have also taken the place of the Lord and his sons on horses!
And horse handlers are now ladies!

SN3O5079

At least these kids are not taking it all too seriously!

SN3O5082

The Overlord was pulled along atop a small float.

SN3O5083

Bow to the Lord!

SN3O5071

At last the ones all had been waiting!
The Sabre dancers!
This very feature gives the unique name and fame of this festival in the whole of Japan!
Enormous obi/sashes are wrapped around giant swords secured by sashes around the dancers’ waists.

SN3O5072

All the dancers carry different obi/sashes wrapped around their swords.
The “apron” is also unique.
All are made of expensive silk. They carry a real fortune along which is is displayed only for three days every three years!
The Parade is a very expensive a affair to take charge of. Therefore it has been held every 3 years only for 107 times!

SN3O5104

The dancing is also a tough challenge along the 1.7 km ( 1 mile) main road which takes more than two hours.
To think they go through that three days in a row!

SN3O5105

The Dancers have to hold an umbrella (they certainly need it in the heat!) with one hand, make big waves with the other hand and raised the knees high with every step!

SN3O5110

Tough work to raise your knees under that heavy apron!

SN3O5111

Tough work too to raise your arm above the shoulder and make a circling wave back and forward!

SN3O5114

A well-earned rest!
Mind you, even in such a sitting position it must be tough to carry all that finery along!

SN3O5115

Fortunately an army of handlers is there to give plenty of support, water and encouragements!

SN3O5118

One thing was sure, all had strong legs!
The dancers are basically different every three years as it is a very sought after honor!

SN3O5116

This particular dancer was very popular with the crowd as he took often the time to look and wink at them. Note the whiskers!

SN3O5121

A common feature to top-class Japanese Festivals, the “matoi” or firemen festival pole!

Waiting for you!

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

So Good Sushi Restaurant in Nice France
Navigating Nagoya by Paige, Shop with Intent by Debbie, BULA KANA in Fiji, Kraemer’s Culinary blog by Frank Kraemer in New York,Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pie
rre.Cuisine
, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento, Hapabento, Kitchen Cow, Lunch In A Box, Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Ichi For The Michi by Rebekah Wilson-Lye in Tokyo, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in Kansai by Nevitt Reagan!
ABRACADABREW, Magical Craftbeer from Japan
-Whisky: Nonjatta: All about whisky in Japan by Stefan Van Eycken
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Non gastronomy must-see sites by Shizuoka Residents

HIGHOCTANE/HAIOKU by Nick Itoh in Shizuoka City

The 3 Big Shimada City Festivals in 2016 and Beyond 2: Shimada Mage (Topknot) Festival-島田髷まつり

On Sunday, September 18th, 2016 the Annual Shimada Mage (Topknot) Festival will be held in Shimada City!
This festival is increasingly taking importance in our Prefecture beyond our borders and it has become a must for tourists, photographers and festival lovers!

SN3O0252

Festival drum and of the day!

There are several different theories regarding the origins of the Shimada Mage hair style.
Some say it was created by prostitutes working in the Shimada-juku inn district on the old Tokaido route to Edo.

SN3O0254

Tiny pose for the picture!

Others say it is the style used by the Kabuki actor Shimada Mankichi (1624-1643).

SN3O0255

Start of the drums marking the formal beginning of the festival!

Another theory is the Japanese word Shimeta, in the sense of tied-up hair, became “Shimada”.

SN3O0257

Hurrying to join the parade!

An alternative account is that Tora Gozen, a native of Shimada, devised the style herself.
Tora Gozen was a prostitute said to have been on good terms with Soga Juro Sukenari, the elder of the two brothers in the famous tale of Soga.
She is also depicted in Kabuki theater as Oiso no Tora, a key character in works such as Kotobuki no Taimen.

SN3O0259

Walking toward the first dance square!

In front of the Yakushiji Hall in the grounds of Uda-ji temple in the Noda district of Shimada City is a stone memorial known locally as “the grave of Tora Gozen”.

SN3O0264

Worrying mother!
The ladies, from kindergarten to their thirties are all local, volunteer, and different every year!

Today, there are many traditional Japanese hair styles that carry the name Shimada, including the Bunkin Taka Shimada style widely used for brides at wedding ceremonies.

SN3O0269

Dancing on the square in front of Shimada JR Station North Exit!

Other styles include the Yuiwata Shimada, Kanoko Shimada, Osome Shimada, Oshidori Shimada, and the Yakko Shimada.

SN3O0271

The inaugural Shimada Nage Festival was held on September 17th, 1933, but it was suspended during the war years,
Thanks to the efforts of the Shimada Mage Festival Preservation Committee (Shimada Branch of the Hairdressers’ Union) the festival was re-launched in 1965 and has since become a major event in Shimada’s tourism calendar.

Uda-ji’s temple main hall houses an exhibition of hairpieces in many different styles. Visitors have the opportunity to peruse the exhibits close-up.

SN3O0272

Traditional Japanese hairstyles (nihon-gami in Japanese) are categorized into four distinct traditions: the Taregami and Kogai styles used by nobles of the Imperial court; Hyogo mage, with a strong influence from the Asian mainland; Katsuyama Mage, purpotedly pioneered by a prostitute from the warrior class named Katsuyama; and the threefold Shimada Mage style, conceived by the prostitute Tora Gozen. Evolving in Japan’s distinct social conditions, these styles sometimes functioned as emblems of the wearer’s socail class, age, occupation, and other characteristics.

SN3O0276

Shimada Mage is the most popular traditional Japanese hair style.

SN3O0277

It has been worn since the 13th century, but like the other Japanese hair styles, it developed mainly during the 18th century, as part of a wider blossoming of Japanese traditional culture.

SN3O0282

The Shimada Mage Festival is held on the third Sunday of September each year. Women dressed in matching yukata (summer kimono) and a variety of traditional Japanese and Shimada hair styles parade through the streets of Shimada City.
The parade departs from the Hon-dori 7-chome intersection at noon. It stops to perform dances in Obi-dori street, the square outside the Shimada Station, and various other locations, before proceeding to Oi-jinja shrine. At the shrine a further dance is performed, dedicated to the Ubusuna deity. After a short break the parade resumes, passing the Shimada City Hospital, and on to Uda-ji Temple. Dances are performed at the temple in honor of Tora Gozen and the Buddha, and a thanksgiving ceremony is held at the main temple hall where a variety of Japanese-style hairpieces are on display. (The parade participants and others involved in the festival also pay their respects at the grave of Tora Gozen).

SN3O0284

Various Shimada hair style

*Taka Shimada
The most handsome of all Shimada styles. Usually worn by younger women. The Bunkin Taka Shimada variation, set highest and considered particularly elegant, is worn today by brides at weddings.

*Otome Shimada
A variant of Taka Shimada developed in downtown communities. Based on the Taka Shimada but distinguished by features such as a kanzashi hairpin inserted between the front and the side portions of the hair, and a piece of cloth placed on the topknot. Also called Saisoku Shimada.

SN3O0285

*Tsubushi Shimada
Popularized by townsfolk and women serving at inns in the early 1800s, and once the most widely worn of all Shimada styles. Tsubushi means “press down”, referring to the indentation in the center of the knot.

*Yuiwata
Very popular in the mid-1800s among 18 to 19 year-old unmarried women. Prepared in the same way as the Tsubushi Shimada, but with a piece of cloth and/or cord added on the center of the knot. The knot also has a distinctive rounded end.

SN3O0286

*Genroku Shimada
Initially worn among prostitutes in the Genroku era (late 1600s). Later became popular among young townsfolk. The hair is folded to produce a topknot that is narrow with a high end, tied in place with a cord.
**Other styles include Osome Shimada and Yakko Shimada.

Other classic Japanese hair atyles

*Katsuyama
Devised and popularized by Katsyuyama, a prostitute of the Yoshiwara district in old Tokyo. Worn mainly by wives of lords, warriors and other members of the upper classes in feudal times.

*Iccho Gaeshi
One of the most well known Nihongami styles. Worn by women of all ages from 15 through 60, and by both ordinary folk and those in the entertainment world.

*Fukiwa
Worn by princesses and other nobility. Also worn by characters in traditional theater such as Shizuka Gozen and Princess Yaegaki. Modeled on a style worn by women who were engaged or had a pre-arranged marriage partner. Thought to have inspired the Katsuyama style, and later evolved into the Maru Mage rounded style.

*Momoware
Worn by 17~18 year olds around the 19th and 20th centuries. The rounded shape was thought to resemble a peach (momo), hence the style’s name.

SN3O0289

日本髪
“Nihongami” Japanese hair styles

Numerous variations of Nihongami (the Japanese hair style) can be treated using the four key parts of the hair: mage (topknot), maegami (front), bin (sides), and tabo (back)

*Mage (髷: the hair is brought together into a single bunch at the top of the head and tied round into a knot.

*Maegami (前髪): The hair near the forehead.

*Bin (鬢): The hair at the sides of the head, above the ears.

*Tabo (髱): The hair towards the back of the head. Also known as tsuto (つと) in West japan.

*Motodori (根髷): This term describes the cord holding all the above parts together at the peak of the head. This motodori is then used to tie the mage or topknot.

*Kamoji (髢): A hairpiece.

*Kushi (櫛): A comb used to neaten hair and remove dirt.

*Kanzashi (簪): A decorative hairpin, inserted at the front or rear of the hair.

*Kanoko (鹿の子): A tie-dyed accessory for hair. Often colored red or yellow.

SN3O0292

ACCESS TO SHIMADA

From Mt. Fuji Shizuoka Airport:
By car: approximately 15 minutes to Yoshida Exit on the Tomei Expressway and 10 minutes to Sagara Makinohara Exit. About 30 minutes to JR Shimada or JR Kanaya Stations and downtown Shimada.

By bus: airport buses to Shimada Station as well as to Shizuoka and Kakegawa Stations are on service.

[Inquiries]
Shimada City Tourism Association
14-2 Kanaya Shinmachi, Shimada City, Shizuoka Prefecture, 428-0047 japan
Telephone: 0547-46-2844
Fax: 0547-46-2861
HOMEPAGE

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

So Good Sushi Restaurant in Nice France
Navigating Nagoya by Paige, Shop with Intent by Debbie, BULA KANA in Fiji, Kraemer’s Culinary blog by Frank Kraemer in New York,Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pie
rre.Cuisine
, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento, Hapabento, Kitchen Cow, Lunch In A Box, Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Ichi For The Michi by Rebekah Wilson-Lye in Tokyo, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in Kansai by Nevitt Reagan!
ABRACADABREW, Magical Craftbeer from Japan
-Whisky: Nonjatta: All about whisky in Japan by Stefan Van Eycken
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Non gastronomy must-see sites by Shizuoka Residents

Cafe: O-cha Bokko in Ieyama, Kawane Cho, Shimada City! Along the Oigawa Railway line!

SN3O0325
SN3O0325

Service: very friendly and ever smiling
Equipment & facilities: basic but very clean
Prices: very reasonable
Strong points: home-made cakes. Crafts

SN3O0328
SN3O0328

The other day when I visited my good friend Osamu Kurosawa/黒澤修さん in Ieyama, kawane-Cho, Shimada City he told me I had to pay a visit to a good friend of his, Mr. Fujio Hino/飛野藤雄さん, who, after retirement, opened a very original cafe 9 years ago along a mountain road overlooking Ieyama!

SN3O0324
SN3O0324

The place looks like a pyramid having landing out of nowhere all surrounded with artifacts made from natural products and finds!

SN3O0330
SN3O0330

In good weather you can avoid the crowded interior and relax outside!

SN3O0327
SN3O0327

For cat lovers?

SN3O0336
SN3O0336

The atelier at the back!

Mr. Hino is more of a hobby artist than of a cafe entrepreneur!
Only coffee, tea and soft drinks are available, but if you give him a phone call beforehand you can bring you own alcohol (that he enjoys much, too!) and even your own food!

SN3O0339
SN3O0339

Succulent Japanese-style cake with Kawane=Cho green tea!

SN3O0342
SN3O0342

And the home-made chiffon cake is a real beauty!

OCHABOKKO-HINO-3

Apparently many famous people left their signatures!

SN3O0333
SN3O0333

A minuscule counter for about 6 people right in the middle of an atelier!

SN3O0331
SN3O0331

Take your time and a good look at all the real and cute objets d’art created with local natural products!

SN3O0334
SN3O0334

A game for the kids!

SN3O0349
SN3O0349

Now, what is this?

OCHABOKKO-22

Mr. Hino is capable to create real-life insects with hemp palm (棕櫚 in Japanese)!

SN3O0352
SN3O0352

He made those two just for me!

SN3O0354
SN3O0354

Don’t forget to look around!
A pagoda still in its making!

SN3O0355
SN3O0355

Pine cone owls everywhere!

OCHABOKKO-HINO-4

Do pay him a visit any time!
The most original cafe in the whole Shizuoka Prefecture!

O-Cha Bokko Cafe
Owner: Mr. Fujio Hino/飛野藤雄

428-0104 Shimada City, Kawane Cho, Ieyama, 1806-15 (400 m above Owada Station along the Oigawa Railway Line.)
The SL Train will run past it at 10:20, 11:07 and 12:14
tel.: 09054977728
Opening hours: 10:00~18:00
Closed on Wednesdays
Small car park available
BLOG (Japanese)

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

So Good Sushi Restaurant in Nice France
Navigating Nagoya by Paige, Shop with Intent by Debbie, BULA KANA in Fiji, Kraemer’s Culinary blog by Frank Kraemer in New York,Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pie
rre.Cuisine
, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento, Hapabento, Kitchen Cow, Lunch In A Box, Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Ichi For The Michi by Rebekah Wilson-Lye in Tokyo, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in Kansai by Nevitt Reagan!
ABRACADABREW, Magical Craftbeer from Japan
-Whisky: Nonjatta: All about whisky in Japan by Stefan Van Eycken
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Non gastronomy must-see sites by Shizuoka Residents

HIGHOCTANE/HAIOKU by Nick Itoh in Shizuoka City

Mr. Osamu Kurosawa’s Home In Ieyama, Shimada City! (Third Visit!)

I finally managed to pay a belated visit to my good friend Osamu Kurosawa in Ieyama, Shimada City!
Mr. Osamu Kurosawa, a very old friend of mine, decided after retirement as an officer at the Shizuoka Municipal Library to buy an old farm house in Ieyama, Shimada City for a meaningful life, now that he has plenty of time not only to really enjoy it but to make other people also share his pleasure.
Osamu is actually the recognized expert on Shizuoka, especially Shizuoka City, history and culture and has already published a number of books and papers on it.
He does not intend whatsoever to rest on his laurels and has embarked on a mission to promote the town he is presently living in.
He has just registered his home a member of Japanese Airbnb under the name, “Shimada Ieyama Shounso”, to provide cheap accommodation with all necessary facilities for people and tourists wishing to experience the real Japanese rural life in the “outback” of Shizuoka Prefecture!

SN3O0296
SN3O0296

The small farmhouse has been completely refurbished for comfort and everyday life at a walking distance from Ieyama Station along the Oigawa Railway Line extending from Kanaya, Shimada City to Ikawa in the Japanese Southern Alps!

SN3O0294
SN3O0294

The view from the first floor entrance!

SN3O0315
SN3O0315

It stands by real tea fields of Kawane, producing top-class green tea in Japan!

SN3O0295
SN3O0295

The entrance itself gives a good indication of what to expect inside!

SN3O0322
SN3O0322

Ask Osamu to translate his own life’s philosophy!

SN3O0293
SN3O0293

I have already described the interior during my first visit and second visit.
The place has been considerably reformed since, especially the kitchen and the tatami room here above!

SN3O0028
SN3O0028

The guest room on the second floor! Sorry, it was a bit dark when I visited it!

SN3O0029
SN3O0029

It has its own terrace!

KUROSAWA-13

A real Japanese atmosphere!

SN3O0292
SN3O0292

The place is still full of artifacts and real history and antiques that Osamu will have a pleasure to introduce to all!

KUROSAWA-18

But my favorite place is still the Japanese traditional hearth (irori/囲炉裏), whatever the season!

KUROSAWA-16

Always ready for a cooking fire!

SN3O0290
SN3O0290

A landscape pot made with local wild plants!

KUROSAWA-17

Osamu went as far as to create his own coasters and under-plates!

SN3O0302
SN3O0302

I had brought a very unusual sake from Niigata prefecture for Osamu who is a great lover of good food drink!

SN3O0306
SN3O0306

We shared around a barbecue of enormous chicken wings cooked over charcoal!

Looking forward to the next visit!

Do visit Osamu Kurosawa on his FACEBOOK blog as he is fluent in English and Spanish!

OSAMU KUROSWA/黒澤修さん

Shimada City, Kawane Cho, Ieyama, 763-2
Tel.: 09085525739

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

So Good Sushi Restaurant in Nice France
Navigating Nagoya by Paige, Shop with Intent by Debbie, BULA KANA in Fiji, Kraemer’s Culinary blog by Frank Kraemer in New York,Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pie
rre.Cuisine
, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento, Hapabento, Kitchen Cow, Lunch In A Box, Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Ichi For The Michi by Rebekah Wilson-Lye in Tokyo, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in Kansai by Nevitt Reagan!
ABRACADABREW, Magical Craftbeer from Japan
-Whisky: Nonjatta: All about whisky in Japan by Stefan Van Eycken
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Non gastronomy must-see sites by Shizuoka Residents

HIGHOCTANE/HAIOKU by Nick Itoh in Shizuoka City