Category Archives: Minobu Railway Line

Shizuoka Prefecture Railway Stations: Minobu Railway Line (Fuji City~Inako)

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The Minobu Line (身延線 Minobu-sen) is a railway line in the Tōkai region of Japan operated by the Central Japan Railway Company (JR Central). It connects Fuji Station in Fuji, Shizuoka to Kōfu Station in Kōfu, Yamanashi, and the Tōkaidō Main Line with the Chūō Main Line trunk railroads.

The Fuji Horse Tramway (富士馬車鉄道 Fuji Basha Tetsudō) opened a line from Suzukawa (present Yoshiwara) on the Tōkaidō Main Line to Ōmiya (present Fujinomiya) (the southern end of the current route) in 1890.

The Fuji Minobu Railway (富士身延鉄道 Fuji Minobu Tetsudō) purchased the tramway in 1912, and converted it to a steam railway the following year, gradually extending the line to Minobu, a distance of 26.9 miles (43.3 km) by 1920. In 1927, the line was electrified, and in 1928 extended to Kōfu on the Chūō Main Line completing the line with a distance of 54.7 miles (88.0 km).

In 1938 the Minobu line was leased by the government, and nationalized in 1941. The alignment at Fuji was changed in 1968 to allow through trains to operate from Tokyo without requiring a reversal of direction, and the Fuji – Fujinomiya section was duplicated between 1969 and 1974.

CTC signalling was commissioned in 1982, and freight services ceased in 1987, the year that Central Japan Railway Company (JR Central) took over operations of the Minobu Line following privatization of the Japanese National Railways.

The Fujikawa limited express service operates between Kōfu and Shizuoka via Fuji using JR Central 373 series EMU trains. Other trains are all-stations “Local” services, with higher frequencies on the Fuji – Nishi-Fujinomiya and Kajikazawaguchi – Kōfu sections compared to the section in between. 313 series and 211 series EMUs are used on local services.

FUJI STATION/富士駅 (Not to be confused with Shin Fuji Station/新富士駅, which is used only for Shinkansen trains!)

MINOBU-LINE-FUJI

Location: Honchō 1-1, Fuji City, Shizuoka Prefecture(静岡県富士市本町1-1)

In 1889, when the section of the Tōkaidō Main Line connecting Shizuoka with Kōzu was completed, stations were built at Suzukawa (Yoshiwara) and Iwabuchi (Fujikawa), with Kashima village in between without a train station. Due to the strong petition of the local residents, and political pressure applied by Oji Paper Company, who had established a paper mill nearby, a station was opened on April 21, 1909 and named “Fuji Station”. The terminus of the Minobu Line was established at Fuji Station on July 13, 1913. The station building was rebuilt in 1964. Container freight services began operations from 1994.
The Fuji Station has three island platforms serving six tracks, which are connected each other an overpass, which leads to station building, which is also constructed over the tracks. The station building has automated ticket machines, TOICA automated turnstiles and a manned “Green Window” service counter.

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YUNOKI STATION/柚木駅

MINOBU-LINE-YUNOKI

Location: Yunoki 213, Fuji City, Shizuoka Prefecture(静岡県富士市柚木213)

Yunoki Station was opened on July 1, 1931, as the Motoichiba Signal Depot (本市場停留場 Motoichiba Singoba). It was elevated to full station status as the Motoichiba Station (本市場駅 Motoichiba-eki) on October 1, 1938, when the Minobu Line was leased to the national government. It came under control of the Japanese Government Railways (JGR) on May 1, 1941. The JGR became the Japan National Railway (JNR) after World War II. In September 1961, the tracks from Fuji to Tatebori were double tracked, and the Motoichi Station building was demolished and relocated 1.5 kilometers to the east of its former site, at which time it was given its present name. Along with its division and privatization of JNR on April 1, 1987, the station came under the control and operation of the Central Japan Railway Company.
Yunoki Station consists of dual opposing side platforms. The unmanned station building is located underneath the platforms, and has automated ticket machines and automated turnstiles, with installtion of TOICA to be completed by 2010.

TATEBORI STATION/竪堀駅

MINOBU-LINE-TATEBORI

Location: Nakajima 3, Fuji City, Shizuoka Prefecture(静岡県富士市中島3)

Tatebori Station was opened on March 8, 1926 as the Tatehori Signal Depot (竪堀停留場 Tatebori Singoba). It was elevated to full station status on November 5, 1927 for both passenger and freight services. When the Minobu Line was leased to the national government from October 1, 1938, the station was renamed “Tatebori”. It came under control of the Japanese Government Railways (JGR) on May 1, 1941. The JGR become the JNR (Japan National Railways) after World War II. Freight services were discontinued in 1969. The same year, the tracks from Fuji to Tatebori were double tracked, and the Tatebori Station building was demolished and relocated 400 meters to the east of its former site. Along with its division and privatization of JNR on April 1, 1987, the station came under the control and operation of the Central Japan Railway Company.
Tatebori Station consists of elevated dual opposing side platforms. The ground-level station building has automated ticket machines, automated turnstiles and a manned service counter. Installation of TOICA was completed in 2010.

IRIYAMASE STATION/入山瀬駅

MINOBU-LINE-IRIYAMASE

Location: Takaoka-Honcho 1-1, Fuji City, Shizuoka Prefecture(静岡県富士市鷹岡本町1-1)

Iriyamase Station was opened on July 20, 1913, as one of the original Minobu Line stations for both passenger and freight services. It came under control of the Japanese Government Railways (JGR) on May 1, 1941. The JGR became the JNR (Japan National Railway) after World War II. Freight services were discontinued in 1972, the same year that the tracks from Fuji to Fujinomiya were expanded to a double track system. Along with the division and privatization of JNR on April 1, 1987, the station came under the control and operation of the Central Japan Railway Company.

Iriyamase Station consists of a single island platform. The station building has automated ticket machines, automated turnstiles and a manned service counter. TOICA installation will be completed by the end of 2010. A small park outside the station has a preserved D51 steam locomotive. A spur freight line leads to the nearby Oji Paper Company factory.

FUJINE STATION/富士根駅

MINOBU-LINE-FUJINE

Location: Tenma782, Fuji City, Shizuoka Prefecture(静岡県富士市天間782)

Fujine Station was opened on July 20, 1913, as one of the original Minobu Line stations for both passenger and freight services. It came under control of the Japanese Government Railway (JGR) on May 1, 1941. The JGR became the Japan National Railway (JNR) after World War II. Freight services were discontinued in 1972, the same year that the tracks from Fuji to Fujinomiya were expanded to a double track system. Along with the division and privatization of JNR on April 1, 1987, the station came under the control and operation of the Central Japan Railway Company.
Fujine Station consists of a single island platform. The station building has automated ticket machines, automated turnstiles and has been unmanned since 1998. TOICA installation is scheduled for completion in 2010. A short shunt track from Track 1 allows for parking and storage of various maintenance of way equipment for the Minobu Line.

GENDOOJI STATION/源道寺駅

MINOBU-LINE-GENGOOJI

Location: Gendōji-cho, Fujinomiya City, Shizuoka Prefecture(静岡県富士宮市源道寺町)

Gendōji Station began as Gendōji Signaling Depot (源道寺停留場 Gendōji singoba) on December 25, 1930, as part of the original Minobu Line. When the line was leased to the national government from October 1, 1938, it was elevated to Gendōji Station for both passenger and freight services. It came under control of the Japanese Government Railways (JGR) on May 1, 1941. The JGR became the JNR (Japan National Railway) after the end of World War II. Freight services were discontinued in 1971, the same year that the tracks from Fuji to Fujinomiya were expanded to a double track system. Along with the division and privatization of JNR on April 1, 1987, the station came under the control and operation of the Central Japan Railway Company.
Gendōji Station consists of a dual opposed side platforms. The station building has automated ticket machines, automated turnstiles and has been unmanned since 1983. TOICA installation is scheduled for completion in 2010.

FUJINOMIYA STATION/富士宮駅

MINOBU-LINE-FUJINOMIYA

Location: 16 Chuo-machi, Fujinomiya City, Shizuoka Prefecture(静岡県富士宮市中央町16)

Fujinomiya Station was opened on July 20, 1913 as part of the original Minobu Line under the name of Omiya Station (大宮駅 Omiya-eki). It came under control of the Japan National Railway on May 1, 1941 and on October 1, 1942 its name was changed to the present name. The station building was rebuilt in 1983. Regularly scheduled freight service was discontinued from 1984. Along with the division and privatization of JNR on April 1, 1987, the station came under the control and operation of the Central Japan Railway Company. The station was remodeled in 2007 to allow for barrier free access.
Fujinomiya Station consists of a single side platform serving Track 1, which is an auxiliary platform used primarily for chartered trains by the Soka Gakkai organization, and a single island platform for Track 2 and Track 3, which handle regularly scheduled services. The station building is built on the overpasses connecting the platforms, and has automated ticket machines, automated turnstiles and a manned service counter.

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NISHI FUJINOMIYA STATION/西富士宮駅

MINOBU-LINE-NISHI-FUJINOMIYA

Location: Kibune-cho 1, Fujinomiya City, Shizuoka Prefecture(静岡県富士宮市貴船町1)

Nishi-Fujinomiya Station was opened on July 15, 1927 as part of the original Minobu Line under the name of Ōmiya-Nishimachi Station (大宮西町駅 Ōmiya-Nishimachi-eki). It came under control of the Japanese Government Railways (JGR) on May 1, 1941 and on October 1, 1942 its name was changed to the present name. The JGR became the JNR (Japan National Railway) after World War II. Regularly scheduled freight service was discontinued from 1960. Along with the division and privatization of JNR on April 1, 1987, the station came under the control and operation of the Central Japan Railway Company. Services by the limited express Fujikawa ceased from October 1, 1995.
Nishi-Fujinomiya Station consists of a single island platform serving two tracks, with a third track on a headshunt to permit passage of express trains. The station building has automated ticket machines, automated turnstiles and has a manned service counter. TOICA installation is scheduled for completion by 2010.

NUMAKUBO STATION/沼久保駅

MINOBU-LINE-NUMAKUBO

Location: Numakubo, Fujinomiya City, Shizuoka Prefecture(静岡県富士宮市沼久保)

Numakubo Station was opened on August 15, 1929 as part of the original Minobu Line. It came under control of the Japanese Government Railways (JGR) on May 1, 1941. The JGR became the Japan National Railway (JNR) after the end of World War II. Along with the division and privatization of JNR on April 1, 1987, the station came under the control and operation of the Central Japan Railway Company.
Numakubo Station consists of a single side platform for bi-directional traffic. The platform has a small wooden shelter, but there is no station building. The station is unmanned. The station is noted for its view of Mount Fuji, which has inspired a number of poets. Opposite the station is a stone monument with a poem by Kyoshi Takahama, composed on this location.

SHIBAKAWA STATION/芝川駅

MINOBU-LINE-SHIBAKAWA

Location: Shibakawa-chō Habuna, Fujinomiya City, Shizuoka Prefecture(静岡県富士宮市芝川町羽鮒)

Shibakawa Station was opened on March 1, 1915 as a terminal station of the original Fuji-Minobu Line for both passenger and freight services. The line was extended past Shibukawa by 1918. It came under control of the Japanese Government Railways on May 1, 1941. The JGR became the JNR (Japan National Railway) after World War II. Freight services were discontinued in 1972. Along with the division and privatization of JNR on April 1, 1987, the station came under the control and operation of the Central Japan Railway Company. Operations by the limited express Fujikawa were discontinued in 1995. From 1998, the station building has been unattended.
Shibukawa Station consists of a single island platform serving two tracks, with a third track on a headshunt to permit passage of express trains. The station building has automated ticket machines, automated turnstiles and is unmanned.

INAKO STATION/稲子駅

MINOBU-LINE-INAKO

Location: Shibakawa-chō Shimoinako, Fujinomiya City, Shizuoka Prefecture(静岡県富士宮市芝川町下稲子)

Inako Station was opened on August 15, 1929 as part of the original Minobu Line for both passenger and freight services. It came under control of the Japanese Government Railways (JGR) on May 1, 1941. The JGR became the Japan National Railways (JNR) after World War II. Freight services were discontinued in 1961. Along with the division and privatization of JNR on April 1, 1987, the station came under the control and operation of the Central Japan Railway Company.
Inako Station consists of a single side platform for bi-directional traffic, located on a headshunt to permit passage of express trains. The station building has automated ticket machines, automated turnstiles and is unmanned.

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