Category Archives: Japanese Festivals

Gion Festival in Yoshiwara, Fuji City (2016) 1): Kimono-clad Girls

Every year on the second week-end of June a very old Japanese Festival is held in Yoshiwara/吉原 in Fuji City/富士市 called Yoshiwara Gion Festival/吉原祇園祭り.
Although it is a well-known festival in Our Prefecture, it seems they welcome more visitors from Tokyo than from Shizuoka City!
A great pity indeed!
I was able at last to witness it, that is part of it as I had to unfortunately come back early in the evening missing the floats parade.
I still manage quite a few pictures to give a good idea of what to enjoy next year!
As there are too many photos for a single report I divided them according to their genre or subject.
This first one is about a rare occasion when young girls can enjoy the day wearing kimono, or more exactly yukata for many of them!

KIMONO-GIRLS-2

Note the modern footwear!

KIMONO-GIRLS-3

Hungry girls enjoying a treat!

KIMONO-GIRLS-4

Little ones with a girl wearing traditional geta/下駄/wooden clogs!

KIMONO-GIRLS-5

Definitely the more traditional kind!

KIMONO-GIRLS-6

Enjoying shaved ice in the heat!

KIMONO-GIRLS-7

Cold drinks in the shade!

KIMONO-GIRLS-8

The modern kind? LOL

KIMONO-GIRLS-9

Note the fans!

KIMONO-GIRLS-1

Meet you there again next year!

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

So Good Sushi Restaurant in Nice France
Navigating Nagoya by Paige, Shop with Intent by Debbie, BULA KANA in Fiji, Kraemer’s Culinary blog by Frank Kraemer in New York,Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pie
rre.Cuisine
, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento, Hapabento, Kitchen Cow, Lunch In A Box, Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Ichi For The Michi by Rebekah Wilson-Lye in Tokyo, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in Kansai by Nevitt Reagan!
ABRACADABREW, Magical Craftbeer from Japan
-Whisky: Nonjatta: All about whisky in Japan by Stefan Van Eycken
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Non gastronomy must-see sites by Shizuoka Residents

HIGHOCTANE/HAIOKU by Nick Itoh in Shizuoka City

Carp Streamers in Kanaya, Shimada City!

The other day I was attending the Kanaya Tea Festival in Shimada City with some American friends.
One of them had gone on his own fro a while and he joined us again he realized he had forgotten his small coin purse in a small shop he had visited/. He was about to give up, but since this is Japan, we knew we had a good chance to find there and decided to accompany him back there!

KANAYA-CARPS-2

It meant we had to go into an area of Kanaya I didn’t know.
That is when we discovered a small river crossing the town!

KANAYA-CARPS-3

The 5th of May being near and the very next festival the river was literally covered with carp streamers!

KANAYA-CARPS-4

Koinobori (鯉幟), meaning “carp streamer” in Japanese, are carp-shaped wind socks traditionally flown in Japan to celebrate Tango no sekku (端午の節句), a traditional calendrical event which is now designated a national holiday; Children’s Day (Kodomo no Hi, 子供の日).

KANAYA-CARPS-5

These wind socks are made by drawing carp patterns on paper, cloth or other non-woven fabric. They are then allowed to flutter in the wind. They are also known as satsuki-nobori (皐幟).

KANAYA-CARPS-6

Children’s Day takes place on May 5h, the last day of Golden Week, the largest break for workers and also a week in which businesses usually close for up to 9–10 days. Landscapes across Japan are decorated with koinobori from April to early May, in honor of children for a good future and in the hope that they will grow up healthy and strong.

KANAYA-CARPS-7

The Japanese consider the carp the most spirited fish — so full of energy and power that it can fight its way up swift-running streams and cascades. Because of its strength and determination to overcome all obstacles, it stands for courage and the ability to attain high goals. Since these are traits desired in boys, families traditionally fly Koinobori from their homes to honor their sons.

KANAYA-CARPS-8

Today, along with the raising of Koinobori in each household, children also “indulge in kashiwa-mochi”, sticky rice cakes wrapped in oak leaves, and other sweets. As a tradition, throughout Children’s Day, children also thank and show respect for relatives, parents, and teachers for support throughout their life.

KANAYA-CARPS-9

Look aroun and you will find that these streamers become a great theme for photography!

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

So Good Sushi Restaurant in Nice France
Navigating Nagoya by Paige, Shop with Intent by Debbie, BULA KANA in Fiji, Kraemer’s Culinary blog by Frank Kraemer in New York,Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pie
rre.Cuisine
, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento, Hapabento, Kitchen Cow, Lunch In A Box, Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Ichi For The Michi by Rebekah Wilson-Lye in Tokyo, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in Kansai by Nevitt Reagan!
ABRACADABREW, Magical Craftbeer from Japan
-Whisky: Nonjatta: All about whisky in Japan by Stefan Van Eycken
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Non gastronomy must-see sites by Shizuoka Residents

HIGHOCTANE/HAIOKU by Nick Itoh in Shizuoka City

The 3 Big Shimada City Festivals in 2016 and Beyond 1: Kanaya Tea Festival

The Kanaya Tea Festival is the more important for being held only every two years!
It is held on the second week end of April for two days, meaning that the ladies and girls of the whole town parade no less than 4 times during that time!
In 2016 it will be held Saturday April 9th and Sunday April 10th!

SN3O0081

When you arrive at Kanaya Station you will know that something is on although it does not take place in front of the station!

SN3O0082

The welcoming committee!

SN3O0129

Expect to be asked toe with the welcoming party for the official photo album!

SN3O0080

All ladies from the town participate to the whole festival!

SN3O0083

As for the little ones, they do need some help!

SN3O0079

A small dance party of cha musume will be on show in front of the Station all day!

SN3O0078

No less than three generations!

SN3O0207

You will find out that the revelers do not  wait for the tourists to enjoy a few drinks before joining in the parade!

SN3O0157

Such a festival is hard work and those veterans definitely enjoyed the respite!

SN3O0133

All under the watchful eyes of the organizers?

SN3O0134

Cha Musume Pageant!

SN3O0136

Alright, ladies! Get ready!

SN3O0137

Let me help with those knots!

SN3O0147

So cute!

SN3O0149

Note the way the dancers were carrying their belongings!

SN3O0153

Over 1,000 dancers all set!

SN3O0166

During that time onlookers are busy feeding themselves! Takoyaki!

SN3O0165

Okonomiyaki!

SN3O0163

Tea leaves massage!!

SN3O0162

Professional demonstration!

SN3O0145

Attentive young dancers!

SN3O0158

Never too young to start! In two years time these little girls will be veterans!

SN3O0139

Some great pics to take!

SN3O0200

And you can expect some strong ladies taking part in more muscle-straining roles!

Like in many festivals all over Japan, drums are a main feature not to miss, whatever the size or level!

SN3O0175

Drums has been one of the main features of the Kanaya Tea Festival right from the beginning!
Apparently this was the sole responsibility of the men at first, but now ladies and youngsters of all ages take part for a complete participation by the population of Kanaya Town!

SN3O0176

These days the drum float is motorized and all six districts bands use it in turns!

SN3O0197

Kanaya Taiko/金谷太鼓/The Drums of Kanaya!

SN3O0198

Young and young at heart!

SN3O0201

Mind you, the men were not losing out!

SN3O0202

Note the little kid in the front on the left!
Not afraid at all!

SN3O0203

They certainly enjoy themselves!

SN3O0204

Expect the drummer of the day to be still a high school girl!

SN3O0205

And what about those kids! Incredible!

SN3O0170

Photographers should remember that “faces” could make up for a whole theme!

A friend of mine said the man above looked like a disguised truck driver!
These guys look fierce, but actually it’s all banter and fun!

SN3O0172

Now, what faces are in front?

SN3O0173

Even if you ask them to look fierce, they are bound soon or later to burst into laughter!

SN3O0168

Even looking fierce these locals will invite you for a drink!

SN3O0207

And young visitors and tourists will find their soul brotheres and sisters!

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

So Good Sushi Restaurant in Nice France
Navigating Nagoya by Paige, Shop with Intent by Debbie, BULA KANA in Fiji, Kraemer’s Culinary blog by Frank Kraemer in New York,Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pie
rre.Cuisine
, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento, Hapabento, Kitchen Cow, Lunch In A Box, Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Ichi For The Michi by Rebekah Wilson-Lye in Tokyo, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in Kansai by Nevitt Reagan!
ABRACADABREW, Magical Craftbeer from Japan
-Whisky: Nonjatta: All about whisky in Japan by Stefan Van Eycken
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Non gastronomy must-see sites by Shizuoka Residents

Japanese Festivals: The “Big Three” in Shimada City!

There are many known and not so known reasons to keep an attentive eye on the City of Shimada in Shizuoka prefecture, the more for it with the noticeable increase in foreign tourists thanks to the increasingly busy Fujisan Shizuoka Aiport in The same City of Shimada!

SN3O0028

Tourists disembarking from the Airport should spare a minute to look at a big billboard outside Shimada Railway Station as it is written in no less than three languages, English, Chinese and Korean, depicting the three major festivals held in this City!

SN3O0029

The Shimada Taisei (Obi Festival)!

SN3O0030

This Festival has been held since 1695 and is one of the so-called three strangest Festivals in japan!
It is being held every years!

SN3O5072

Photo taken on 1th of October 2013!

The big attraction of course is the parade held with the 25 “Oyakko” dressed in attire of yore carrying umbrellas and long wooden swords draped with expensive traditional cloth!

SN3O4959

But there is still more to watch, especially the “floats fights” and the children dances!
For complete reports consult HERE (1), HERE (2), HERE (3), HERE (4), HERE (5), HERE (6), and HERE (7)!

The last Shimada Taisei (Obi Festival) was held in 2013, and will be held in 2016 and 2019 (Rugby World Cup Year which will include venues in Shizuoka Prefecture!)!

SN3O0033

The second big festival is the “Kanaya Tea Festival!

SN3O0034

Kanaya used to be a city of its own before it was recently merged with Shimada City, but it has preserved its own true identity.
Every two years no less than 1,000 “Tea Gilrs/Cha Musume” of all ages and status parade along the main street to celebrate the budding of the tea leaves every two years in the second week of April!

SN3O0153

Photo taken on the 13th of April 2014!

Actually almost the whole population of Kanaya is taking part!
But there are many more opportunities for great pictures and videos!

SN3O0204

Even young schoolgirls beating the drums like men!

The kanaya Tea Festival will be next held in 2016, 2018 and 2020 (the Year of the Tokyo Olympics!)!
For full report consult HERE (1), HERE (2), HERE (3), HERE (4) and HERE (5)!

SN3O0031

The third big festival is the Shimada Mage Matsuri (Women Topknot Festival)!

SN3O0032

It is a festival held to commemorate the creation of a lady topknot worn all over Japan said to be created by Tora Gozen, a courtesan native of Shimada!

SN3O0273

Photo taken on the 21st of September 2014!

On the third weekend of September 50 girls and ladies parade all around Shimada City with their hair/topknot done in the traditional Japanese fashion!

SN3O0257

This festival is held every year, but the 50 different participants are always different!

For full report consult HERE!

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

So Good Sushi Restaurant in Nice France
Navigating Nagoya by Paige, Shop with Intent by Debbie, BULA KANA in Fiji, Kraemer’s Culinary blog by Frank Kraemer in New York,Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pie
rre.Cuisine
, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento, Hapabento, Kitchen Cow, Lunch In A Box, Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Ichi For The Michi by Rebekah Wilson-Lye in Tokyo, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in Kansai by Nevitt Reagan!
ABRACADABREW, Magical Craftbeer from Japan
-Whisky: Nonjatta: All about whisky in Japan by Stefan Van Eycken
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Non gastronomy must-see sites by Shizuoka Residents

HIGHOCTANE/HAIOKU by Nick Itoh in Shizuoka City

Shimada Mage (Topknot) Festival-島田髷まつり

Last Sunday, September 21st, was held the Annual Shimada Mage (Topknot) Festival in Shimada City!
This festival is increasingly taking importance in our Prefecture and it has become a must for tourists, photographers and festival lovers!

SN3O0252

Festival drum and of the day!

There are several different theories regarding the origins of the Shimada Mage hair style.
Some say it was created by prostitutes working in the Shimada-juku inn district on the old Tokaido route to Edo.

SN3O0254

Tiny pose for the picture!

Others say it is the style used by the Kabuki actor Shimada Mankichi (1624-1643).

SN3O0255

Start of the drums marking the formal beginning of the festival!

Another theory is the Japanese word Shimeta, in the sense of tied-up hair, became “Shimada”.

SN3O0257

Hurrying to join the parade!

An alternative account is that Tora Gozen, a native of Shimada, devised the style herself.
Tora Gozen was a prostitute said to have been on good terms with Soga Juro Sukenari, the elder of the two brothers in the famous tale of Soga.
She is also depicted in Kabuki theater as Oiso no Tora, a key character in works such as Kotobuki no Taimen.

SN3O0259

Walking toward the first dance square!

In front of the Yakushiji Hall in the grounds of Uda-ji temple in the Noda district of Shimada City is a stoe memorial known locally as “the grave of Tora Gozen”.

SN3O0264

Worrying mother!
The ladies, from kindergarten to their thirties are all local, volunteer, and different every year!

Today, there are many traditional Japanese hair styles that carry the name Shimada, including the Bunkin Taka Shimada style widely used for brides at wedding ceremonies.

SN3O0269

Dancing on the square in front of Shimada JR Station North Exit!

Other styles include the Yuiwata Shimada, Kanoko Shimada, Osome Shimada, Oshidori Shimada, and the Yakko Shimada.

SN3O0271

The inaugural Shimada Nage Festival was held on September 17th, 1933, but it was suspended during the war years,
Thanks to the efforts of the Shimada Mage Festival Preservation Committee (Shimada Branch of the Hairdressers’ Union) the festival was re-launched in 1965 and has since become a major event in Shimada’s tourism calendar.

Uda-ji’s temple main hall houses an exhibition of hairpieces in many different styles. Visitors have the opportunity to peruse the exhibits close-up.

SN3O0272

Traditional Japanese hairstyles (nihon-gami in Jaanese) are categorized into four distinct traditions: the Taregami and Kogai styles used by nobles of the Imperial court; Hyogo mage, with a strong influence from the Asian mainland; Katsuyama Mage, purpotedly pioneered by a prostitute from the warrior class named Katsuyama; and the threefold Shimada Mage style, conceived by the prostitute Tora Gozen. Evolving in Japan’s distinct social conditions, these styles sometimes functioned as emblems of the wearer7s socail class, age, occupation, and other characteristics.

SN3O0276

Shimada Mage is the most popular traditional Japanese hair style.

SN3O0277

It has been worn since the 13th century, but like the other Japanese hair styles, it developed mainly during the 18th century, as part of a wider blossoming of Japanese tradional culture.

SN3O0282

The Shimada Mage Festival is held on thr third Sunday of September each year. Women dressed in matching yukata (summer kimono) and a variety of traditional Japanese and Shimada hair styles parade through the d\streets of Shimada City.
The parade departs from the Hon-dori 7-chome intersection at noon. It stops to perform dances in Obi-dori street, the square outside the Shimada Station, and various other locations, before proceeding to Oi-jinja shrine. At the shrine a further dance is performed, dedicate to the Ubusuna deity. After a short break the parade resumes, passing the Shimada City Hospital, and on to Uda-ji Temple. Dances are performed at the temple in honor of tora Gozen and the Buddha, and a thanksgiving ceremony is held at the main temple hall where a variety of Japanese-style hairpieces are on display. (The parade participants and others involved in teh festival also pay their respects at the grave of Tora Gozen.

SN3O0284

Various Shimada hair style

*Taka Shimada
The most handsome of all Shimada styles. Usually worn by younger women. The Bunkin Taka Shimada variation, set highest and considered particularly elegant, is worn today by brides at weddings.

*Otome Shimada
A variant of Taka Shimada developed in downtown communities. Based on the Taka Shimada but distinguished by features such as a kanzashi hairpin inserted between the front and the side portions of the hair, and a piece of cloth placed on the topknot. Also called Saisoku Shimada.

SN3O0285

*Tsubushi Shimada
Popularized by townsfolk and women serving at inns in the early 1800s, and once the most widely worn of all Shimada styles. Tsubushi means “press down”, referring to the indentation in the center of the knot.

*Yuiwata
very popular in the mid-1800s among 18 to 19 year-old unmarried women. Prepared in the same way as the Tsubushi Shimada, but with a piece of cloth and/or cord added on the center of the knot. The knot also has a dinstictive rounded end.

SN3O0286

*Genroku Shimada
Initially worn among prostitutes in the Genroku era (late 1600s). Later became popular among young townsfolk. The hair is folded to produce a topknot that is narrow with a high end, tied in place with a cord.
**Other styles include Osome Shimada and Yakko Shimada.

Other classic Japanese hair atyles

*Katsuyama
Devised and popularized by Katsyuyama, a prostitute of the Yoshiwara district in old Tokyo. Worn mainly by wives of lords, warriors and other members of the upper classes in feudal times.

*Iccho Gaeshi
One of the most well known Nihongami styles. Worn by women of all ages from 15 through 60, and by both ordinary folk and those in the entertainment world.

*Fukiwa
Worn by princesses and other nobility. Also worn by characters in traditional theater such as Shizuka Gozen and Princess Yaegaki. Modeled on a style worn by women who were engaged or had a pre-arranged marriage partner. Thought to have inspired the Katsuyama style, and later evolved into the Maru Mage rounded style.

*Momoware
Worn by 17=18 year olds around teh 19th and 20th centuries. The rounded shape was thought to resemble a peach (momo), hence the style’s nmae.

SN3O0289

日本髪
“Nihongami” Japanese hair styles

Numerous variations of Nihongami (the Japanese hair style) can be treated using the four key partsof the hair: mage (topknot), maegami (front), bin (sides), and tabo (back)

*Mage (髷: the hair is brought together into a single bunch at the top of the head and toed round into a knot.

*Maegami (前髪): The hair near the forehead.

*Bin (鬢): The hair at the sides of the head, above the ears.

*Tabo (髱): The hair towards the back of the head. Also known as tsuto (つと) in West japan.

*Motodori (根髷): This term describes all the above parts together at the peak of the head. This motodori is then used to tie the mage or topknot.

*Kamoji (髢): A hairpiece.

*Kushi (櫛): A comb used to neaten hair and remove dirt.

*kanzashi (簪): A decorative hairpin, inserted at the front or rear of the hair.

*Kanoko (鹿の子): A tie-dyed accessory for hair. Often colored red or yellow.

SN3O0292

ACCESS TO SHIMADA

from Mt. Fuji Shizuoka Airport:
By car: approximately 15minutes to Yoshida Exit on the Tomei Expressway and 10 minutes to Sagara Makinohara Exit. About 30 minutes to JR Shimada or JR Kanaya Stations and downtown Shimada.

By bus: airport buses to shimada Station as wella s to shizuoka and Kakegawa Stations are on service.

[Inquiries]
Shimada City Tourism Association
14-2 Kanaya Shinmachi, Shimada City, Shizuoka Prefecture, 428-0047 japan
telephone: 0547-46-2844
Fax: 0547-46-2861
HOMEPAGE

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

So Good Sushi Restaurant in Nice France
Navigating Nagoya by Paige, Shop with Intent by Debbie, BULA KANA in Fiji, Kraemer’s Culinary blog by Frank Kraemer in New York,Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pie
rre.Cuisine
, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento, Hapabento, Kitchen Cow, Lunch In A Box, Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Ichi For The Michi by Rebekah Wilson-Lye in Tokyo, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in Kansai by Nevitt Reagan!
ABRACADABREW, Magical Craftbeer from Japan
-Whisky: Nonjatta: All about whisky in Japan by Stefan Van Eycken
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Non gastronomy must-see sites by Shizuoka Residents

Jirochyou O-Mikoshi Parade at Shimizu Harbor Festival!

One more attraction at the Shimizu Harbor Festival in Shimizu Ku, Shizuoka City was of course the O-Mikoshi Parade held in Jirochou Street, otherwise called “Jirochou Douchuu”!

SN3O0055

The O-Mikoshi arriving through Jirocho Bridge across the Tomoe River!

A mikoshi (神輿 or 御輿) is a divine palanquin (also translated as portable Shinto shrine). Shinto followers believe that it serves as the vehicle to transport a deity in Japan while moving between main shrine and temporary shrine during a festival or when moving to a new shrine. Often, the mikoshi resembles a miniature building, with pillars, walls, a roof, a veranda and a railing.

Roots:
The altar of the harvest festival carried out to the time which repeated migration by hunting and collection is the origin of a mikoshi.
Some theorize that “The origin of Japanese mikoshi is ancient Jewish tabernacle ark”.
Actually, mikoshi and the ark of the covenant do not have much in common. They differ in production and decoration (a phoenix or a crane being very different from cherubim.).

First use:
A mikoshi was believed to have been first used to transport Hachiman to Tōdai-ji temple from Usa Shrine 八幡宇佐宮御託宣集 in 749.

SN3O0056

Arriving to the sound of drums hit by children!

SN3O0057

Slowly moving across the bridge!

SN3O0059

Yo ei! Yo ei!

SN3O0064

Interesting pants!

SN3O0065

The drumming kids are all local!

SN3O0070

Many worshipers form other shrines have come to end a hand!

SN3O0071

The O-Mikoshi belongs to the Shimizu Harbor Association!

SN3O0072

A portable shrine in truth!

SN3O0073

Interesting faces!

SN3O0081

Smiles everywhere!

SN3O0060

Hard work!

SN3O0061

More hard work!

SN3O0062

Waiting for their turns!

SN3O0063

Great support from other shrines!

SN3O0066

Great control!

SN3O0067

First and third generations!

SN3O0068

More faces!

SN3O0069

No age limit!

SN3O0074

The phoenix!

SN3O0075

Beer-guzzling mothers?

SN3O0076

Having a closer look at the drums!

SN3O0077

Overlooking the event!

SN3O0078

Having a closer look at the shrine and its phoenix during a break!

SN3O0079

Great kid!

SN3O0080

Family power!

SN3O0082

Taking a break at Jirochou’s birthplace before starting all over again!

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

So Good Sushi Restaurant in Nice France
Navigating Nagoya by Paige, Shop with Intent by Debbie, BULA KANA in Fiji, Kraemer’s Culinary blog by Frank Kraemer in New York,Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pie
rre.Cuisine
, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento, Hapabento, Kitchen Cow, Lunch In A Box, Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Ichi For The Michi by Rebekah Wilson-Lye in Tokyo, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in Kansai by Nevitt Reagan!
ABRACADABREW, Magical Craftbeer from Japan
-Whisky: Nonjatta: All about whisky in Japan by Stefan Van Eycken
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Non gastronomy must-see sites by Shizuoka Residents

Drummers at Shimizu Harbor Festival!

On the first week end of August every year a festival is held in Shimizu Harbor, Shimizu Ku (formerly Shimizu City), Shizuoka City.
I finally managed to visit it on its last yesterday and one of the events that particularly attracted me were the drums played by different local amateur groups!

SN3O0085

I cam early enough to witness the preparations!

SN3O0084

A lot of prep talk as ever!

SN3O0086

Each group brought their own drums!

SN3O0087

Heavy work!

SN3O0088

Getting slowly ready!

SN3O0089

Adjusting their costumes!

SN3O0090

Taking it easy before the action!

SN3O0091

Big smile!

SN3O0092

All set!

SN3O0093

Still smiling on the third day of the festival!

SN3O0095

Kids first!

SN3O0096

Very energetic!

SN3O0097

Bright future!

SN3O0098

The next group had an unusual technique!

SN3O0100

Drumming sideways?

SN3O0101

Back to a more traditional technique!

SN3O0102

Change of colors with the next group!

SN3O0103

Waiting for the signal!

SN3O0104

Age doesn’t matter!

SN3O0108

Cute!

SN3O0105

The men of the next group conferring!

SN3O0106

Smiling faces from the same group!

SN3O0107

Pose!

SN3O0109

The younger members in action first!

SN3O0110

Musical loop next!

SN3O0111

Woman power!

SN3O0112

Adults in action!

SN3O0113

Thank you all!

RECOMMENDED RELATED WEBSITES

So Good Sushi Restaurant in Nice France
Navigating Nagoya by Paige, Shop with Intent by Debbie, BULA KANA in Fiji, Kraemer’s Culinary blog by Frank Kraemer in New York,Tokyo Food File by Robbie Swinnerton, Green Tea Club by Satoshi Nihonyanagi in Shizuoka!, Mind Some by Tina in Taiwan, Le Manger by Camille Oger (French), The Indian Tourist, Masala Herb by Helene Dsouza in Goa, India, Mummy I Can Cook! by Shu Han in London, Pie
rre.Cuisine
, Francescannotwrite, My White Kitchen, Foodhoe, Chucks Eats, Things that Fizz & Stuff, Five Euro Food by Charles,Red Shallot Kitchen by Priscilla,With a Glass, Nami | Just One Cookbook, Peach Farm Studio, Clumsyfingers by Xethia, PepperBento, Hapabento, Kitchen Cow, Lunch In A Box, Susan at Arkonlite, Vegan Lunch Box; Tokyo Tom Baker, Daily Food Porn/Osaka, Only Nature Food Porn, Happy Little Bento, J-Mama’s Kitchen, Cook, Eat, Play, Repeat, Bento Lunch Blog (German), Adventures In Bento, Anna The Red’s Bento Factory, Ohayo Bento,

Must-see tasting websites:

-Sake: Ichi For The Michi by Rebekah Wilson-Lye in Tokyo, Tokyo Through The Drinking Glass, Tokyo Foodcast, Urban Sake, Sake World
-Wine: Palate To Pen, Warren Bobrow, Cellar Tours, Ancient Fire Wines Blog
-Beer: Another Pint, Please!, Beering In Good Mind: All about Craft Beer in Kansai by Nevitt Reagan!
ABRACADABREW, Magical Craftbeer from Japan
-Whisky: Nonjatta: All about whisky in Japan by Stefan Van Eycken
-Japanese Pottery to enjoy your favourite drinks: Yellin Yakimono Gallery

Non gastronomy must-see sites by Shizuoka Residents